1.4 Nutrient Composition vs. DRI


#1

Nutrient…DRI…1.4…result
Omega3…1.6g…1.29g…UNDER
Vitamin C…90mg…60mg…UNDER
Mn…2.3mg…2mg…UNDER

Please explain. Thank you in advance.


#2

I am familiar with Ozone and Carbon, but what does Ma stand for. :stuck_out_tongue:


#3

My mistake - Mn. Thank you.


#4

Not sure where you’re getting the DRI for carbon and ozone or their amounts in 1.4 but I suspect that the 2mg of manganese listed on the website is round off error. On the packaging it says a bag has 100%. Perhaps @Conor can look into this.


#5

“O3” was meant to be “omega 3”, “C” was meant to be “Vitamin C”. Thank you.


#6

As far as I can see the FDA doesn’t have a DRI for omega 3.

Guidance for Industry: A Food Labeling Guide (7. Nutrition Labeling; Questions G1 through P8)

N28. Can information about nutrients that do not have an RDI/DRV such as boron and omega-3 fatty acids be provided on the food label?

Answer: Yes, provided that the information is truthful and not misleading and is provided outside the Nutrition Facts label. Such information is limited to statements of amount or percent of a nutrient (eg. 300 mg omega 3) and may not characterize the level of the nutrient (you may not state “High in Omega-3”). 21 CFR 101.13(i)(3)

The 1.4 nutrition facts say 37% Vitamin C per 1/4 pouch. So one bag contains 148% of the FDA’s recommended 60 mg (about 89 mg).

The FDA recommendation is 2 mg, which is why Soylent 1.4 says 25% per 1/4 pouch.


#7

I think it would be helpful to show where @nutrisludge is getting numbers from. The FDA has a DRI Calculator that allows you to figure out how much of each nutrient you need. It does indeed list a DRI for omega-3 as α-Linolenic Acid of 1.6g/day. If you look at the Soylent website under “What is Soylent made of?” it does list what appears to be substandard values for the nutrients in question. But if you look at the nutrition label on the packages it lists adequate values for each (except omega-3 which it doesn’t list at all). There is definitely a discrepancy between the DRIs, DRVs, and RDIs.


#8

@wezaleff
"As far as I can see the FDA doesn’t have a DRI for omega 3."

You are correct. DRI for omega 3 hasn’t been established. However, per Soylent, “The AI for ALA is 1.6g per day for men, and 1.1g per day for women.” http://diy.soylent.me/wiki/fat

“The 1.4 nutrition facts say 37% Vitamin C per 1/4 pouch. So one bag contains 148% of the FDA’s recommended 60 mg (about 89 mg).”

If that’s true, there seems to be a disconnect between the information on Soylent’s landing page (60 mg vitamin C) and the pouch. https://www.soylent.com/

“The FDA recommendation is 2 mg, which is why Soylent 1.4 says 25% per 1/4 pouch.”

Which is in apparent contradiction to the DRI of 2.3 mg per day. http://www.iom.edu/Global/News%20Announcements/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/DRI_Summary_Listing.pdf


#9

I’m assuming AI is average intake. The FDA does not seem to believe that hitting a specific amount each day is necessary.

It is true. You can check the 1.4 nutrition facts yourself if you don’t believe me.

I’m not surprised the website is wrong; it’s apparently hard for them to keep numbers in sync across many different pages as the ingredients change. I don’t have the nutrition facts in front of me, but I think Soylent 1.0 had 100% (60 mg) of Vitamin C per pouch.

It’s not a contradiction because the IOM is not the FDA. Rosa Labs has to follow the FDA guidelines on the nutrition facts panel. A small % difference in recommendations is not surprising since they are not necessarily based on the same data. I don’t know whether 2 mg or 2.3 mg is a better figure, but they are relatively close.


#10

@wezaleff
"You can check the 1.4 nutrition facts yourself if you don’t believe me."
I have no reason to disbelieve you. You seem to be a person of intelligence and integrity.

“It’s not a contradiction because the IOM is not the FDA. Rosa Labs has to follow the FDA guidelines on the nutrition facts panel. A small % difference in recommendations is not surprising since they are not necessarily based on the same data.”

You are correct.


p.127


#11

@Conor @nutrisludge
I’ve got the same question for Omega-6 (and Omega-6).

Never have to worry about food again. That’s the promise?

US NRI recommendations (per day for men);

  • LA (Omega 6) is; 8.15g / 17g = 48% DRI
  • ALA (Omega 3) is; 1.27g / 1.6g = 80% DRI

US NRI recommendations (per day for women);

  • LA (Omega 6) is; 8.15g / 12g = 68% DRI
  • ALA (Omega 3) is; 1.27g / 1.1g = 115% DRI

#12

AI is usually Adequate Intake, used when there is insufficient information to establish an RDA.

On manganese - it’s one of the few minerals where getting a little too much is liable to be a bad thing, over time. Excess manganese can accumulate in the brain, leading to concerns over lifetime dietary exposure to an excess. While manganese deficiency is known to exist in animals and is expected to happen in people, it has not been identified in humans eating any diet. Manganese toxicity - usually from non-food sources - is well known.

One last thing - the AI for manganese is 2.3 for men. For women it’s 1.8. The DV for package labelling is 2.0.

DV numbers are not exactly the DRI, AI, or RDA, because all of those may vary by age and gender. The DV is always a single number. The purpose of the DV is to give you a clue - high in this, low in that - and allow you to compare foods and find foods high in what you’re low on, not to tell you the exact contents in mg.


#13

The National Academy of Science Institute of Medicine (IOM) specifies that an Adequate Intake (AI) for Omega 6 to be 17 g/d and for Omega 3 to be 1.6 g/d. IOM defines AI as, “AI…is believed to cover the needs of all individuals in the group, but lack of data prevent being able to specify with confidence the percentage of individuals covered by this intake.”

The IOM specifies an Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Range (AMDR) of 5-10% (of daily energy) for Omega 6 and .6-1.2% for Omega 3. IOM defines AMDR as, “the range of intake for a particular energy source that is associated with reduced risk of chronic disease while providing intakes of essential nutrients. If an individual consumes in excess of the AMDR, there is a potential of increasing the risk of chronic diseases and/or insufficient intakes of essential nutrients.”

Since a daily Soylent ration appears to contain 2000 kcal, the AMDR for Omega 6 would be 100-200 kcal. The AMDR for Omega 6 would be 12-24 kcal. Therefore, using 8.8 kcal per gram of fat, the AMDR for Omega 6 would be 11.4-22.7g. The AMDR for Omega 3 would be 1.4-2.7g. Soylent 1.4 contains 1.29g of Omega 3, close to the minimum AMDR. Soylent 1.4 contains 8.15g of Omega 6, outside of the AMDR. Soylent 1.4 doesn’t appear to “hit the numbers” for the IOM’s AI and AMDR for Omegas 3 and 6.

https://www.iom.edu/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/DRI_Macronutrients.pdf

@battlespace1 Excuse my ignorance, but what is NRI?


#14

While you are right Soylent isn’t providing the suggested amounts of ω6 and ω3 it doesn’t have to to be healthy. The 17g of ω6 is the average intake for Americans, a group of people showing no signs of deficiency, meaning 50% of Americans get less and are fine. Of course getting less than 17g does up your odds of getting a deficiency but only because you are getting closer to an undefined minimum.

The 1.6g of ω3 is a therapeutic dose and is also not a minimum. Like ω6 getting less inches you close to an undefined minimum and away from an amount that is therapeutic. Getting less than a therapeutic dose is not unhealthy it’s just not as healthy as it could be.


#15

@battlespace1 could you link me to the source of this?

US NRI recommendations (per day for men);

  • LA (Omega 6) is; 8.15g / 17g = 48% DRI
  • ALA (Omega 3) is; 1.27g / 1.6g = 80% DRI

US NRI recommendations (per day for women);

  • LA (Omega 6) is; 8.15g / 12g = 68% DRI
  • ALA (Omega 3) is; 1.27g / 1.1g = 115% DRI