Any DIY recipes I can use with items found in stores?


#1

I’d like to see how a liquid diet would fair, and was wondering if there was a DIY recipe that just happens to be composed of easy-access ingredients for a nutritionally-balanced daily diet? Would probably just try it for a few days, but ideally, if it’s something I can live off of, that’d be nice. I have food stamps, which is why I’d prefer the ingredients be mainly from stores if possible.

I’m thinking something like some kale, oats, maybe a specific multi-vitamin, and some other stuff mixed in a blender.


#2

I would recommend that you order some samples from http://www.powderedfoods.com/. I believe some or all of the recipes are open so you could find one you like and then not have to buy everything local. At the very least you can see if a liquid diet is for you.


#3

@axcho published this recipe which is staggeringly simple and, except for the specific multivitamin that you might have to order, no problem from any grocery store. Other than the vitamin it’s just oat flour, whole milk and iodized salt, and while it’s not perfect it’s surprisingly close.

By the way, you can make your own oat flour cheaply from rolled oats (sold as “old-fashioned” as opposed to “quick” oatmeal), with your blender if it’s decent (or a food processor, or some suggest with a coffee grinder).

This would be a very easy, cheap and quick way to find out how you like soylent.


#4

Thanks @asympt. I also recommend trying that simple recipe. You can also use pretty much any multivitamin if you want, it doesn’t strictly have to be that one.


#5

Fiber’s the main thing it’s short on, and you could add or take a fiber supplement, lots of options there.


#6

Interesting; that recipe is pretty simple. I’ll edit this with the multivitamin I use in a bit, but I’m curious as to how good it actually is.

I did make a slight modification to the recipe though; added about 1 Tsp of Ground Cinnamon, and 1 Tbps of Sugar to about a 5 cup batch (have to mess with the recipe a bit more later just to make half of the practice fuel at a time). Tastes way better after that, but I could probably drop the sugar amount a bit.

As for the fiber, I think I have some powder fiber supplement, but I’ll check into that a bit later as well.


#7

If you’re eating that much cinnamon every day, take care. Most cinnamon in the U.S. has high amounts of coumarin, a compound that, if eaten in quantity regularly, may be “moderately toxic to the liver and kidneys.” What quantity?

One teaspoon of cassia cinnamon powder . . . contains 5.8 to 12.1 mg of coumarin, which may be above the tolerable daily intake value for smaller individuals.

If you can get your hands on Ceylon cinnamon, it contains very little coumarin, so you could feel comfortable with your teaspoon a day. It’s more expensive though. If you just flavor your soylent with ordinary inexpensive cinnamon every so often, you’re probably fine (and some people probably are already getting too much cinnamon with their regular bakery habits).


#8

You might consider to buy a sample set of different blends before investing into ingredients (some of them you cannot buy by piece).

And PFM marketplace as mentioned @JeffLeBert is the right place for that.