Anyone using 2.0 botles to make 1.8?


#1

I haven’t done this but I’m thinking of it so please critique me.

  1. Keep 2.0 bottles after using them.

  2. Figure out how much 1.8 powder would go into a 2.0 bottle to make the 14 fluid ounces that the 2.0 bottles contain. (Just because a bottle of 2.0 contains 400 calories of 2.0 doesn’t necessarily mean 1/5th of a 2000 calorie 1.8 bag would go in the bottle.)

  3. Put the right amount of 1.8 powder into a 2.0 bottle and do this for a bunch of bottles.

  4. When you want a bottle of 1.8, add water to the bottle (and you’d probably have to add water, then shake, then add more water, like you do when you make a pitcher of 1.8).

UPSiDES: You could make the less expensive 1.8 at will at 400 calories at a time instead of making 2000 calories and having to be sure you consume it in 2-3 days.

DOWNSIDES: It would be a bit of a hassle, but the idea is to do a bunch at once and then it’s done. And it might be hard to get the powder into the 2.0 bottle hole but I’m thinking a funnel might help with that.

Okay, there it is, what do you think? I doubt that this is such an original idea that nobody has thought of it before.


#2

I think it sounds like way too much trouble.


#3

The bottles have a narrow neck, it would be a pain getting the powder in. Also they would be a pain to clean for re-use.

Anyway, why not just make a pitcher-full and then pour from the pitcher into bottles? You could pour it all at once, or just pour one shaker-bottle as you leave for work.


#4

Aren’t these contradictory? You don’t want to make 2000 calories at a time, but you do want to make multiple (five, perhaps?) 400 calories at a time that you’d have to consume in 2-3 days?


#5

I’m just going to make the bottles with the powder in them but no water. Then I’m going to add water to one bottle at a time when I use one. In doing so I’d be taking the powder out of the sealed pouch and put it in a bottle and screw on the top so I don’t know if it would start to get old at the point or not.


#6

Sometimes I re-use the 2.0 bottles now and I just rinse the bottles out and then pour water in it and screw the cap back on and shake it hard and then pour out the water and I do that 2-3 times. Is that not sufficient?


#7

I do the same thing. It’s very easy to clean 2.0 bottles for re-use. Maybe @davecortesi meant that the bottles would be harder to wash after a powdered version has been used in them.


#8

I doubt that it’s safe in the long term. But as long as the bottle’s been kept mostly refrigerated since it was opened, I’d figure it was ok to do a couple of times.

Long term, you’d probably want to run the bottles through the dishwasher.


#9

I have plastic blender bottles that I’ve reused for years. How are washed and reused plastic bottles not “safe in the long run”?


#10

Not quite sure why this process seems to controversial to be honest, but FYI the scooper that comes with the pitcher scoops about 200 calories, so it would be two scoops for each 2.0 bottle. Maybe get a funnel? Generally though, I’m not sure why you wouldn’t get a larger water bottle to just sip from throughout the day.


#11

I will often xfer from the pitcher to rinsed out 2.0 bottles either for transport (chilled) or to free up the pitcher to make a new batch (I prefer consumption after it’s been chilled a good 6-8hrs).


#12

How about this then.

  1. Make 1.8 in a pitcher.

  2. Pour the newly made 1.8 into five 2.0 bottles.

  3. Freeze the bottles.

  4. When I want a bottle, take out out of the freezer and thaw and consume it.

I like Soylent but I don’t consume it for a large percentage of my meals and I think my base problem is at any given time having to make the commitment to consume 2000 calories of Soylent in the next 48-72 hours. When I make 2000 calories of Soylent I do consume it in the next 48-72 hours but sometimes that is partly because I’ve made it so I have to either consume it or throw it away. It would be nice to sometimes say “I’ll have 400 calories and be done.” Soylent 2.0 does give you the freedom to do that but it costs more.


#13

This makes sense, but why not open a bag of Soylent, make a glass full, cool it, drink it, throw the unmixed Soylent in the freezer and make more at your leisure? I find that i only have to wait an hour or two when making fresh Soylent before it is cool enough for me.


#14

I used 8 oz Boost bottles. Then I switched to 80 oz glass bottles.


#15

It’s not the kind of bottle, it’s the cleaning method.

@yngh doesn’t say they’re washing the bottles, just rinsing them. That’s good enough to keep a bottle from stinking up the recycling bin, but I’d feel safer adding soap or boiling water to the mix before I reuse it to drink from.


#16

You cannot. 2.0 is the same as 1.7 except for necessary changes due to phase and texture differences.


#17

Why not just use stainless steel water bottles or shaker bottles instead? That is what I do. The plastic in the 2.0 bottles is probably not high quality and meant to be washed and re-used.


#18

I guess I could do that but I didn’t want to buy another bottle and plus I like how the Soylent 2.0 bottles are small-ish so you don’t have to lug around a big bottle.