Are 100% vitamins and minerals realy enough?


#1

Hi - I extracted my post from another thread as it is important for me to see some discussion on this topic:

Maybe a problem with official Soylent and also 100%FOOD could be that they offer almost exactly 100% of the
daily vitamins one needs and I can imagine that when some stuff remains
in the bottle and when you drink it too fast for example the body will not be able to process all the things he needs (+ in the right amounts).

Maybe our bodies are so different that for some of us it is not
possible to process 100% of our intake, because our digestion is just
not that accurate? - Because who says that if I eat exactly xx mg of vitamin xy, that my body really will process exactly xx mg?

I write this because I was very excited about beeing on 100%FOOD and
have been struggling with food cravings ever since. I also found out
that slower drinking can help a bit. But this tells me one thing: Maybe
my body really doesn’t process all the stuff he gets?

This is why I will try DIY, because in general the DIY recipes
tend to not fulfill exactly 100% of vitamins/minerals, but very often
200% and more (without exceeding maximum doses). - And with these doses the body might more likely get everything he needs in the right amounts??

Anyway I think this should be some point we should discuss as well.

What do you think?


#2

Highly unlikely. The 100% RDA is based off of how many calories you’re eating. If you’re someone that needs 4000 calories a day you’re going to need twice as much of all the recommended amounts. Someone that weighs 115lbs does not need the same amount of carbs and iron as someone that’s 6 feet tall and 200 something pounds.

So even if some is left in whatever you’re drinking from that wont be causing problems.

Edit: Also drinking quickly will likely cause problems just because you’re putting a lot of food into your body all at once. Go ahead and chug the same amount of water, or juice, or anything else. Eat a hamburger in 30 seconds instead of taking time to really chew and take breaks between bites. In any of those cases you likely wont feel well and will feel bloated.

As for if drinking quickly means you get less of the nutrients I can’t be sure about that, but even if that IS the case and the body can’t process everything as quickly it’s still processing more than it would if all I did was eat of slice of pizza.


#3

Too much is also a bad thing. ~2.5x the adult male rda for iron, even if it’s non-heme, still doesn’t sound like a good idea over the long term.


#4

Too much is bad of course, but as long as you stay unter the max. daily doses I don’t see a problem there…


#5

If I wanted “tolerable” instead of “optimal”, I’d stick with whole foods.


#6

I don’t feel bloated when drinking soylent quickly. Just saturated, but not as much as when I take more time which is weird.


#7

There’s some stuff only in very low doses (mg/ug), so if some of this remains on the bottle bottom it should be a problem I gues.


#8

My point is if someone on a 2010 calorie diet needs 2.3mg of Manganese, someone on a 4k calorie diet would need 4.6

So if there’s a little bit of soylent left in your cup and you only get 2.2mg of Manganese you’re likely also only getting 1980 calories for the day. So proportionally it should be fine.


#9

There is also the thing about bioavailablity… how much of the stuff you eat actually gets absorbed into your body

Read an example earlier in another post with oils/fats, about the minimum needed being 15% in the diet or 3% injected directly in mice/rats? that just shows an example.


#10

Also consider that the RDAs have tolerances built in, so your consumption is resiliant.


#11

Many of the nutrients are cumulative, as well, so you will absorb more than you need in a 24 hour period. Once your tank is topped off, so to speak, your body goes to work excreting (or not absorbing) unneeded excess.


#12

100% isn’t the optimal value, it’s the minimum value. Optimal values are not officially established, but would be somewhere between the minimum and the maximum.