Baking with soylent, will it evaporate most the things you need?


#1

I’ve seen alot of people on forums baking with soylent and was just wondering if you’ll lose what you gain from drinking it?


#2

It’s not particularly designed for cooking (it’s basically a blend of oat flour, rice protein and starch, which isn’t an especially dexterous kitchen combination) but nutritionally it should be basically OK. Some vitamins will denature with the heat - thiamine, niacin, folate - so I wouldn’t live on a diet strictly composed of baked Soylent goods. If you decide to trade out shakes for Soylent bars, mix in some lean meat and salad greens every now and then.

EDIT: Don’t forget the oil, or at least replace it with something better for your cooking project. Canola will work and it won’t denature at bread-baking temperatures. You could mix in some butter too if you’re inclined. I’d probably skip the fish oil if I was baking cookie bars, but that’s your call.


#3

http://www.beyondveg.com/tu-j-l/raw-cooked/raw-cooked-2e.shtml

I believe this is relevant


#4

The Soylent team has mentioned that Soylent is mostly heat-stable. When you’re baking with Soylent, remember that you’re essentially using a gluten-free mix, so adjust your recipe accordingly.