Beano eliminates gas and is falling out of patent. Soylent should include it


#1

When reporters and bloggers try Soylent, one of the first criticisms is gas. Even though the problem isn’t as great as it once was due to formula changes, it still exists. The problem may go away on its own, but most stories about Soylent are written after only a week of testing.

But Beano eliminates gas, and it falls out of patent on December 5 of this year, 20 years after the patent was filed. Adding it would solve an issue that has consistently been a negative feature in Soylent articles.

What do you think?


#2

If that can be done without altering the formula of Soylent in any detrimental way and also not adding something that might be disagreeable with any of the customer base (for either health or ideological reasons), then personally I think it makes a lot of sense seeing as that’s the primary complaint most people have (and frequently the only complaint). But what do I know about such things… =D


#3

Wasn’t one of the simpler suggestions to preprocess the oats and therefore the gas problem could be greatly reduced?


#4

If that can be done without altering the formula of Soylent in any detrimental way and also not adding something that might be disagreeable with any of the customer base

It’s just a plant-derived enzyme, with no calories. I can’t think of any issues.


#5

@JulioMiles - what say ye?


#6

I’m of the opinion that if it does go away after say 10 days, then leave it out.

The whole point of Soylent is to only have the ingredients we need and nothing more.


#7

Maybe have a starter kit that includes beano?


#8

That could work, as long as it’s made very clear that the reason for it is because of the natural reaction many people have to a diet that includes the recommended amount of fiber, when they aren’t used to it. Otherwise people will get the impression that Soylent is actually to blame as the root of the issue.


#9

I was reading about how (and whether) Beano works, and apparently it breaks down some complex carbs which cause gas, but isn’t effective against certain other causes of gas. So I don’t know whether it would be effective in Soylent’s case. Have any Soylent users tried it?

Also, since it breaks complex carbs into simpler sugars, does Beano raise the glycemic index of food?


#10

Also, since it breaks complex carbs into simpler sugars, does Beano raise the glycemic index of food?

My understanding is that it doesn’t affect complex carbs in general, it affects two certain classes of sugars. It affects one part of dietary fiber that the body has trouble digesting, called polysaccharides, and certain simple sugars that the body also has trouble digesting, called oligosaccharides. I haven’t been able to find anything about it affecting a food’s glycemic index.

As for it working, is there anyone who is waiting for their Soylent and has been eating normal foods so far rather than a DIY mix? They could do a test by using Beano for a couple weeks, then continuing Soylent without Beano, and telling us if gas is produced at any point.

The whole point of Soylent is to only have the ingredients we need and nothing more.

I think that if this were the case, Soylent wouldn’t have been reformulated to taste like (pan)cake batter or to reduce its graininess, things that Soylent did to make the product more pleasant, or at least not unpleasant. I think being particularly gassy, and as some have said, miserably so, is more of an unpleasant experience than grainy texture, and is a real hurdle to adoption by people who aren’t dedicated crowdfunders and DIYers, but are more casual users who Soylent could help. If people only try Soylent for a week and they’re still gassy, that hurdle would become a barrier. People would just decide Soylent doesn’t work for their body, or that the discomfort just isn’t worth paying another $85 to test for another week.


#11

Here’s something from Beano’s FAQ:

IS BEANO® SAFE TO USE FOR DIABETICS?
Each serving of Beano® itself contributes an extremely small number of calories (less than five) to your diet and would be expected to have an insignificant effect on blood glucose. However, Beano® is a natural source food enzyme that works by breaking down indigestible sugars into simpler, more digestible sugars. As a result, it has been estimated that the use of Beano® will produce an additional two to six grams of carbohydrates for every 100 grams of food treated by Beano®. If you have concerns about the use of Beano®, we recommend that you speak with your physician.


#12

Speaking strictly for myself this isn’t the case. A truly bad texture experience would have definitely turned me off… gas for a week or two I didn’t really care about.


#13

That’s possible. I had just noticed more stories complain about the gas than about the texture.


#14

Beano never worked for me. Anecdotally, it made my gas worse.


#15

It’s much more entertaining to tell stories about gas than texture. :wink:


#16

I haven’t done DIY in a very long time, and don’t get much fiber in my diet, so I figured I’d pick up some Beano when (if*) my Soylent arrives.

*People who ordered the same amount of Soylent as me (8 weeks) well after I did (day 1) started getting their tracking numbers over the past few days but I’ve gotten nothing. If I don’t get anything on Monday I’m going to assume that something is wrong with my order… :-/


#17

I haven’t done DIY in a very long time, and don’t get much fiber in my diet, so I figured I’d pick up some Beano when (if*) my Soylent arrives.

Great, thanks! This is fun science. I hope you get your order soon.


#18

Most of us work in offices.


#19

Most of us work in offices.

I, for one, have no problem gassing out my coworkers. :smiley:


#20

I’m a really heavy eater of Cheerios(as a dry snack and sometimes meal replacement) and when I went off them for awhile and came back on them while dieting I had the most horrible, ridiculous amount of gas. I’m pretty sure it was the oats in them and Beano did absolutely nothing for me.