Bromine might be important


#1

This looks interesting.

Bromine is essential for life


New Element Found to be Essential for Human Life
#2

I was so startled, for a second, and then I remembered that my cat was named after the element and not the other way around.

Interesting article. =)


#3

That makes me curious about how much bromine is in Soylent, I would assume there should be plenty?

But after googling a little and coming across this site http://www.acu-cell.com/br.html I noticed that bromine/bromide could be used to treat hyperthyroidism… which got me to remember some posts a while ago where people mentioned thyroid problems on soylent… could this be related? I also recall some of these people later mentioning the problem had gone away again… but still makes me think :slight_smile:

@JulioMiles and @rob could you by any chance look into how much Bromine is in soylent since it’s not listed on the ingredients list?


#4

Is there a list of amino acids in Soylent? I’m wondering if and how much of L-Arginine it has.


#5

I don’t think I’d want this in Soylent. I certainly do not want an underactive thyroid.


#6

this world health organization report seems to suggest bromide is in sodium chloride? if i’m reading it correctly?

http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/chemicals/Fourth_Edition_Bromide_Final_January_2010.pdf


#7

From what I read, it depends on the amount of Bromine? not enough/none is bad for the thyroid… and too much is toxic and harms the thyroid?

hmm but further readings have sites saying it’s harmful to the thyroid… science is hard :smiley: guess it really comes down to how much?

@EricBardwin https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Slt3_5upuSs Periodic Videos says it’s common in sea water

Heres https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wr4wL3YADCc heres a video about the news about bromine being essential from the research team that actually discovered it.


#8

Bromine is in the same family as Iodine, and Iodine is a critical component in T3 and T4 (thyroid hormones) Bromine, being one row higher in the Periodic Table, has a higher electronegativity than Iodine (translation: it takes precedence in chemical bonds over Iodine) and can therefore displace Iodine from those hormones, leading to reduced thyroid function if you have too much Bromine/not enough Iodine. This makes sense why it can treat hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) but can also harm your thyroid (make it underactive, e.g. hypothyroidism).

At least that’s how I understand it.