Can't Stand The Taste & Texture


#1

I received my first box of Soylent recently & have already decided to cancel my subscription. I’ve tried living on it alone with the exception of dinner with my family & other drinks. No matter what I try, I can’t get past the taste & texture of Soylent. It’s just too gross. When I first opened the bag I thought it smelled great, almost like cake mix! Unfortunately the taste doesn’t remotely compare. It tastes like oatmeal or something.

The taste isn’t by any means good, but it’s not a deal-breaker unless it gets warm. I brought a large cup of Soylent to work with me when I was called in on short notice. I had nowhere to refrigerate it, nothing to mix it with & no way to shake the cup without Soylent flying everywhere. I was there for 10 hours & ate before I left. Needless to say It had separated & warmed up where I would have had an easier time drinking my own urine. But yes, I know that’s only a major problem when warm. But that severely cripples the convenience.

What I really can’t stand is the texture. No matter how much water is added to it, how cold it is, how well I mix/shake it, or leave it to soak, there’s always tiny, gritty undissolved bits that float around & inevitably stick to the side of the empty glass.

Between the taste/texture, needing to keep it cold, needing to shake it, rinsing the containers & scraping the grits off the cups, mixing the powder & leaving for a few hours it just doesn’t seem worth it.

Any advice?


#2

Have you tried flavoring it to make it more palatable? I know many people like to use cinnamon, cocoa, or some similar combination (there’s a couple threads out there). I personally like to use maple syrup. A better flavor might make the texture worth it.

I had a similar issue with a couple DIY variants that use a vegan rice protein (even commercially available stuff like Vega) that without any flavoring is just… horrible. Makes me gag. I had to use a ton of cinnamon to cover it up.


#3

Are you adding the oil with the water, or after letting it soak for a few hours?
Best to add the oil after a soak.


#4

Speaking to this, I actually add my oil before mixing, but then I also use an immersion blender with a whisk attachment.

How is OP mixing their Soylent? If shaking, try getting a blender of some sort to really mix things up, that might get a better soak and mouthfeel. If already mixing… I dunno, try chugging?


#5

Nothing is liked by everybody. You describe the taste as being bad, “…like oatmeal or something.” Soylent does taste quite a bit like oatmeal. I like oatmeal, if you don’t…well that makes it harder. You can mask that with flavorings, but you probably can’t mask the grittiness. No matter how you prepare it some of the ingredients will not dissolve completely. I don’t mind the grittiness, but if you hate it, then you probably will not like soylent no matter what you do.


#6

I had to create an account to reply to this post. I think your reaction is a bit unfair, and there are some simple things you can do to make Soylent more palatable.

As for the taste: As you probably know, Soylent is designed to be as plain as possible, so people can flavor it to their needs. To me it sounds like you would benefit from the addition of some form of sweetener. Soylent 1.0 was much sweeter than 1.1 or 1.2, and I liked it quite a lot. You can try adding a small amount of sucralose or stevia to bring up the sweetness, and I suspect you will like that.

As for the texture: One of the problems with Soylent is that it does take a fair bit to get everything mixed together. What I do is mix it by shaking the night before, let it soak overnight, and then shake it again in the morning after adding the oil. You can also mix it in a blender or a food processor to get things going a bit more quickly. You say it’s gritty, and that to me means you haven’t mixed it well enough, or you’ve only shaken it and haven’t let it soak.

As for getting warm: Definitely! Warm Soylent is gross. That’s why I use a vacuum-sealed thermos, it keeps the Soylent refrigerator-cold all day long sitting in my backpack. If you want to take Soylent with you, you need to pack it in an insulated container. And it’s really not that inconvenient, I got a really nice thermos for around 20 dollars, and it can pack about a liter of Soylent which lasts me a full work day.

As for the other stuff: Yeah, you definitely need to shake it. Just like a protein shake. You can get a mixer ball that helps mix it up with shaking, but you really don’t need to break your arms or anything… just shake it for a couple of minutes. The container does get dirty, but rinsing a container isn’t any harder than cleaning dinner plates. Both can be cleaned in a dishwasher, and both can be cleaned pretty easily by hand. As for “scraping the grits off the cups”, if your Soylent is well mixed there shouldn’t be much/any “grits”, and if you rinse and wipe the cup immediately after finishing the Soylent it will stay clean without needing any “scraping”. Honestly, these are all minor things that I personally find to be less inconvenient than dealing with traditional meals.


#7

Believe it or not you do get used to the gritty texture and the taste. Your tastebuds need time to adjust. It will get better with time. I had the same reaction the first time I tried my soylent. But after a week or so of dedicated consumption it actually isn’t all that bad.

If you rinse your glass while its still wet it should come right off. Once it dries that may be a different story.

As far as keeping it cold a thermos will do the trick. Freeze the thermos in the fridge over night with the cap and plug out. Then in the morning shake/swirl and pour your cold Soylent into the thermos, seal it up and go. When your ready to drink shake/swirl again and either pour into a glass or drink out of the thermos. If you want to keep it really cold add a few ice cubes or whiskey stones.

Some other potentially useful items are an immersion blender and a blender bottle.


#8

It’s so funny to me that Soylent gets compared to oatmeal so much, because I just don’t see it. But taste is such a funny thing.

The first thing that came to my mind about this post was - “Why are you determined to go straight to living almost exclusively on Soylent alone?” There have been so many threads about people being terribly unhappy with Soylent when they went from zero to 100% (or close to it) overnight. Maybe you just need to ease into it more slowly?

Then again, maybe it isn’t for you in the same way that a steak isn’t for me. Nothing wrong with that, maybe it just isn’t a product for you. If you want to continue to explore alternative liquid foods, you could try some of the third party soylent blends, but maybe you’ll just plain be happier sticking with conventional food…


#9

I add the oil long after letting it soak. I even forgot about it until half-way through the first batch.


#10

Pretty obvious …Stop drinking your own urine …I mean that has got to do a number on your taste buds.


#11

I think the only reason I compared it to oatmeal is because the three main ingredients before “vitamin and mineral blend” are Maltodextrin; which I don’t know the taste of, Rice Protein; I like rice and Oat Flour; the few times I’ve tried oatmeal I’ve hated it. So I just figured it was the oats.

I’m not determined to go straight to living exclusively on Soylent alone. I said that I have normal dinners with my family, which I should clarify is the only meal I have regularly. So I’ve replaced random snacking with soylent. I wanted to start with just 1/3 a package per day for at least the first week, but I forgot. And I’m sure I’d end up going through it so slowly that it’d expire if I didn’t have it this way.


#12

That’s the thing. I know, Soylent is designed to be as plain as possible, but it does a bad job of it! I was hoping it would be a lot plainer. And I’ve tried adding sugar, honey, chocolate syrup, but none of them do a good job at masking the taste.

I know this is supposed to be less inconvenient than dealing with traditional meals, but I don’t make “traditional meals” I make buttered toast, toast a bagel, have a bowl of cereal. I can’t cook & I know can’t live on that stuff alone but I sure as hell don’t want to learn how to cook because it’s too much work.


#13

If the expectation is that everything will “dissolve” I think you’ll continue to be disappointed. Certainly longer soaks make the texture more smooth. There are ways to improve it. For example, a fruit smoothie doesn’t dissolve completely either, but we don’t tend to think of that the same way. What differs? Thickness mainly, I think. So perhaps making Soylent more thick would help with texture? It could also be a matter of resetting expectations and accepting some level of grit. I like to have water with mine, also helps rinse the mouth.


#14

Regarding the grit that sticks to the glass, I would just swirl a little water around at the end and drink it down like I do with my rinsewater at beer festivals. Keeping it cold definitely helps, but I found it tasted better with slightly less water (1.0, which had more sucralose). A few extra ounces made it taste like cardboard. I’m sure others have mentioned flavoring. I used Hershey’s syrup to good effect, and I have since obtained Hershey’s dark cocoa powder, which is unsweetened, and might be better for you depending on what you’re looking for.


#15

For whatever it’s worth, I’ve lived on pretty close to exactly “that stuff” my entire 41 years. Have always been told by doctors I’m in great overall health and I even qualified for a life insurance tier that I was advised not to try for because “barely anyone ever qualifies”. If it’s the people around you that make you doubt your dietary health (as it always has been for me), you may have less to worry about than they think.

But anyway… the absolute single tastiest way I’ve found to make Soylent (though I rather like the taste of 1.0. 1.1 on the other hand… not nearly as much) was to blend it (already in liquid form) into a smoothie with some fruit juice and sherbet. Granted it’s a little more work to have to do so, but it sure is delicious. And I know that overall I’m drinking something way better for me than a Jamba Juice, for example.

Maybe you can find a way for Soylent to fit into your life, but maybe not. I’d certainly say it was worth a shot though regardless!


#16

The powder is good for 2 years unopened and several weeks opened (much like flour). The oil will last a week or more if kept in the fridge after opening.


#17

Which version do you have? I found 1.1 to be much more “gritty” even after soaking overnight and all the other “best practices.” Adding xantham gum to thicken it did wonders. Supposedly 1.2 will be back to the original texture (aka thicker/less gritty).


#18

I have Soylent v1.2.


#19

Gotcha, then I’d just go with what people have already mentioned, soaking overnight, shaking before drinking, etc.


#20

You’d be surprised how long I can forget about something. I once forgot about a box of donuts for a week.