Children and Soylent


#21

I may be able to help with the volunteers I looked into this a while ago but kind of forgot about it just got back into it and want to know if I would be able to use it if it would help I will try it when I can to help move things along in progressing please let me know if you would recommend I try it


#22

I will try it for the process of maybe helping kids to be able to use this and soylent is not made to replace fod completely just to have a substitute for food


#23

real food is needed somewhat but soylent has everything possibly known to be in food people currently eat its a substitute for food


#24

I believe having this available for children is a great idea. Soylent should start with a population of children that are dying because of lack of nutrition. There can be no more harm done to them and giving them a supplement of some kind can only help. The starving indigenous tribes who are affected by drought and lack of sustainable income would be a good place to start.


#25

It could kill them quicker.


#27

Why? twenty characters.


#28

Well, anything’s possible eh.


#29

As a parent to a child who has had feeding issues since birth, I am very open to the idea. As of right now she is taking 4 bottles of pediasure per day, which is just so much sugar. I’m looking for alternatives now that don’t cost an arm and a leg. For reference, a six pack of pediasure costs 10.99 making her feeding about 7.33 per day.


#30

I’d have given anything to have had Soylent when I was a child. No matter what theoretical, potential, unknown risks there might be… it’s way, way better than what my actual diet was my entire life, all the way up until just over 3 years ago when I started on Soylent (I’m in my mid 40s now). I just don’t see any legitimate risks in giving kids Soylent. Maybe not 100%, sure… and obviously with plenty of attention paid to their health, doctor visits, etc. But seriously, if I had kids I’d absolutely let them have some as a routine part of their diet.


#31

As someone who’s studied in Nutrition and many diets, as well as those regarding children, soylent (while not ideal) would be way way better than pediasure, but not just because of the sugar.
Pediasure uses lower-quality fats which aren’t as healthy for any human (including kids) and the protein source they use is bovine-based (cow-milk) which is linked to early onset puberty, which to sum it up real quick causes many years to be taken off the child’s life long-term and promotes acne, hormonal issues, etc, later on.

The downside to soylent is it doesn’t have much resistant-starch or phytonutrients, but those can only be achieved by vegetables/fruits, which pediasure has none of (slightly less than soylent).
Soylent only, ideally don’t do that long-term (or preferably at all unless they’re sick and prefer it), however it’s way better than pediasure or most snacks you can grab real quick, and unless y’all eat very clean meals and lots of vegetables it’s probably a little healthier than what they generally eat tbh, Soylent has a little high protein for kids and they could use a little more fat (preferably from avocados or walnuts) so if they have it often it wouldn’t hurt to cut back a little on their protein intake, or be more relaxed about them eating high-protein parts of a meal as soylent has a higher than needed ratio (unless they’re teenagers 14+).

I never thought to really give soylent to kids, but now that you mention it I’ll begin recommending people with kids I know who are often on the go to give it a shot :slight_smile:


EDIT: Just to be clear though, I’m speaking of ages toddler and above, below 1yo they shouldn’t really have anything BUT (human) breastmilk, although fruits are fine too, soylent would be acceptable on occasion but I can’t recommend it as a baby formula as I haven’t looked into it that way.
Briefly looking it looks similar and is acceptable, but I am not going down all the nutrients so unless you do I wouldn’t take that chance as the ratios are likely off for literal babies.


#32

I’ve got a friend with a 3 year old who is an extremely picky eater. He pretty much only eats chicken nuggets, he’ll sometimes eat mac and cheese or cheerios or something, but he’s seems more willing to try different drinks because I know he drinks water, milk and different kinds of juice. I’ve been talking about giving them a few bottles of Soylent original for a while now but it hasn’t happened. I get to see them next week and I think I’m just going to give them a whole case of original, because I think it would be really beneficial to their kid if he’ll take it.


#33

I was that kid (OK, 47 years ago). I was so happy when I found Soylent. My life would have been much different (probably better) if I didn’t have all the issues associated with what was basically an eating disorder. I still have the issue of being a picky eater, but now I’m not afraid of lack of nutrition causing an early death.

All that being said, a 3 year old doesn’t care about any of that, but the parents should.


#34

The only real risk i see…is yes Soylent has tje “essential” nutrients covered…but through pur daily “munching” on various food…there is thst possibility of consuming “other” hidden nutrients not even yet known or discovered by man…for example…i liken to use tje example of quercetin in apples…sure maybe its not an “essential” nutrient…but recently within tje last 10 years or so has been “ground-breaking” across the “super food” blogosphere. My parents were eating quercetin before they even knew it (i had to tell them about it)


#35

All I can tell you for certain is, you can name damn near any “normal food” and I wouldn’t eat it as a kid, and don’t eat it now. The list of things I will eat hasn’t changed probably since I was 3, other than actually to get smaller. Soylent would without any question have been better for me nutritionally, even though I still managed to stay healthy and “turn out ok” despite what absolutely everyone around me always insisted was going to happen. But I chalk that up simply to the human body being marvelously resilient, even when given extremely sub-par nutrition. Imagine what it would have done for me to have had “perfect” nutrition that I was actually willing & able to consume, instead. I wish I’d had Soylent when I was a kid, no question.