Confused about carbs


#21

@kthprog: could you please provide a source for that claim?
I am aware of the stress fructose puts on the liver, but if isomaltulose puts on additional strain on the liver (for the same reason maybe), I should consider abandoning it.

I consume 50gr of Isomaltulose a day.


#22

[quote=“Rick, post:21, topic:4706, full:true”]
@kthprog: could you please provide a source for that claim?[/quote]

The pertinent quote is: “Isomaltulose is fully absorbed in the small intestine as glucose and fructose.” about a few sentences into the article.


#23

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dBnniua6-oM is a good starting point to get your fructose facts.


#24

But isomaltulose does not put additional strain on top of the fructose content? If so, I feel safe enough to consume small doses of it until my supply runs out.


#25

Isomaltulose is just a modified form of sucrose. It is absorbed more slowly, but in the end when it enters the bloodstream its the same: one molecule of glucose and another of fructose.

Don’t worry.


#26

As long as it’s completely metabolized, fructose isn’t bad. It’s the excess that gets ya.


#27

Yeah but the levels considered excessive don’t seem very large e.g. about 40g a day, probably more than you’d get from 300g of isomaltulose.


#28

I heard 25-50g per sitting, but I wouldn’t want to go more than 50g/day (that’s just a gut feeling though, more scientific evidence would be welcome). Glucose and fructose have identical molar mass, so in 100g of isomaltulose you’d have 50g glucose and 50g fructose, so I’d suggest not much more than 100g/day (assuming there are no other fructose sources, such as sugar).

The rest of your carbs can come from other sources, such as oat powder (is there any reason you’re not already including some form of starchy carb source? I can’t remember), or possibly even milk if you have no issue with it, it’s got a good mix of cabr/protein/fat, an excellent n-3:n-6 ratio, high in potassium, calcium, phosphorous and riboflavin, with decent amounts of a few other things.


#29

I have to shake my head and chuckle, 'cause you guys just keep adding support to my thesis, over and over again. When I first showed up here, it was practically all elemental-soylent. The focus sure is changing. Rightly so, I think, because the real-foods approach is so much more flexible, taste-acceptable, and low-risk.


#30

I’m actually going the opposite direction and going more elemental. I was finding it too difficult not to go over on certain micro’s by having normal food or using multi vitamins.

Personally I would like to find another solution other than malto and oats for carbs. With the amount of calories that I am attempting to consume it is making it hard to keep my numbers under the UL. But I want to stabilize my current recipe before I start making drastic changes again.


#31

I suspect quite a few people are in the same boat with you on that point. It’s one of the things that makes me wish Rob were taking a more active part here on the forums and discussing the process of refining the formula much more openly. One sometimes gets the feeling here that the shepherd has walked off and left the sheep to look after themselves, which is somewhat sad even if it was bound to happen.


#32

@J_Jeffrey_Bragg , economical too. Cheaper to use whole food ingredients than most processed and refined ingredients. Maltodextrin is an exception, but it’s less an elemental substance as it is a happy medium.


#33

Is it? I wish I knew. I have no experience with maltodextrin; wanted to drop into the Popeye’s in Brandon MB last time I was in town and get some, but just didn’t have the money for it. I would like to be able to decide for myself about maltodextrin.

I watched a couple of the Lustig videos and would like to be able to do something about fructose. I wonder why straight glucose has hardly been mentioned here as an option. I know, I know, high GI, but wikipedia says maltodextrin is absorbed just as rapidly as glucose.


#34

Maltodextrin is probably the cheapest pseudo-complex carbohydrate available, in terms of calories per dollar. A 50 lb bag goes for less than 60 dollars and contains roughly 86,000 calories. 1400 calories/USD.


#35

Glucose is the same thing as dextrose which is discussed in many different formulations, fwict. Karo corn syrup claims to be “0% high fructose corn syrup” which to me is an extremely shady way of not saying that it doesn’t have any fructose in it. If it had 0% fructose, they’d come right out and say it, wouldn’t you think?

Anyway, dextrose looks interesting.


#36

It sort of has, dextrose is another name for glucose[1], has been mentioned a few times, and is often[2] cheaper[3] than maltodextrin. I can’t vouch for taste differences, though I’ve heard there’s not a huge difference. I’ve got a 1kg bag of glucose powder at home that I’ll be testing with once the rest of my ingredients arrive.

EDIT: Ninja’d by @jrowe47, that’ll teach me for doing fancy links… :stuck_out_tongue:


#37

I actually disagree with this. My diet is far cheaper by using more of the elemental ingredients. If I had my pharmacy tech license it would be even cheaper than it is now. But alas, there are some ingredients that I am unable to order, because I am just a regular Joe.
Some of the micronutrients that I have ordered will last me a couple of centuries, which makes the daily cost practically nothing.


#38

@HarveyDesu, do you have a recipe up on makesoylent? Looking to source some elements.


#39

Are you comfortable with the Potassium Citrate? Heard it ruins the taste, so I will use Gluconate.


#40

Any thoughts on sweet potato flour jeff?