Could Soylent in China lead to scarcity of micros?


#1

In China, the traditional diet of vegetables, rice, noodles, and small portions of meat—a diet hailed as one of the world’s healthiest—is disappearing. Chinese people are eating more Western food, more meat, and on top of that, more packaged, on-the-go food that comes with additives, artificial flavoring and other chemicals.


#2

Theyd need a middle class that could afford soylent first


#3

Their middle class is bigger than the population of the EU.


#4

I think Soylent is efficient and apolitical enough to get a greenlight from China’s government. It’d be interesting to see it catch on.


#5

I’m not talking about political issues. I’m talking about a serious number of people consuming powdered micros.


#6

It seems to me that you’re approaching micro’s as a limited precious commodity like gold, or silver.

While no expert on the micronutrient market, I would imagine that like most food products, production would scale up as demand increased.

I could be totally wrong, but I can’t imagine soylent taking less then a decade to become large enough to impact markets and by that time should have telegraphed its growth to have the markets accomodate it.


#7

Mostly I agree with Daiceman; I’ll add that most of the vitamins are created in a scale-able way, and that humans actually don’t indefinitely take up minerals; they are lost again too.


#8

Yeah sure, in the same way that agriculture is a threat to our micronutrient supply. That is to say - not at all. besides that, most are synthesized from more readily available compounds, aside from elemental nutrients.


#9

Don’t forget that Soylent already seems to demand more pea protein powder than the market can supply.


#10

Which may be a good reason for Soylent to source only “pure” ingredients not derived from any natural product. Chemical processes can be scaled quickly, agriculture, not so much. You, sir, have refuted your own point.


#11

What?

I did? And what point is that?