Decent portable Soylent substitute?


#1

So until solid Soylent (3.0?) comes out, I was wondering what among the myriad energy bars out there might make the best cheap convenient and portable substitute on the rare occasions (hiking, skiing etc) where the powder or 2.0 might be inconvenient?

Since it would only be occasional and also because I typically take in 2400-2800kcal/day I don’t really need a 100% diet replacement, just a cheap tasty product with macros in line with my normal Soylent diet (low glycemic, healthy fat).

Just recently tried Clif organic trail mix bars which are 200kcal each and sell between $1.20 and $1.50 (not too out of line with Soylent 2.0)

Scaled to 2 Clif bars (400kcal) to compare to Soylent 2.0:
Total fat: C 26g S 21g
Saturated fat: C 6g S 2g
Trans fat: 0 0
Polyunsaturated: C 5g S 2.5g
Monounsaturated: C 14g S 16g
Cholesterol: 0 0
Sodium: C 320mg S 300mg
Potassium: C 340mg S 700mg
Total carbs: C 38g S 37g
Dietary fiber: C 6g S 3g
Insoluble fiber: C 4g S 1g
Sugars: C 18g S 9g
Protein: C 10g S 20g

I confess I’ve done little research into this… Just curious what products others have found.


#2

My sister really likes “Zone perfect nutrition bars.” They’re cheap, taste good, have a good amount of protein, and hit a lot of micros pretty well. Full of sugar though, so you can probably find a number of better options.


#3

mealsquares


#4

Yeah… I skimmed through the meal squares thread. Price looks like it’s in the ballpark and the macros look ok. I wouldn’t need 12000kcal/mo and they need refrigeration (and even then are only good for 30 days?) Also as I noted I don’t really need all the micros as I would probably still get 2000kcal from Soylent in a day. I’m just looking for an occasional snack or easily transportable food for a hike, airplane flight or ski day…

Looking at many of the other common energy bar products they either seem to be focused on carbs or protein. Few tout healthy fats for low glycemic energy. One article I saw said “Kind” bars were in trouble with the FDA for claiming they were “healthy” when they had too much fat (!!). Best I could tell they also had a lot of carbs/sugars. The Clif product I mentioned above seems to be mainly nuts which is probably most of the healthy fat.


#5

Trail mix, most varieties, is a good source of calories for ease of transport and room temperature storage.

That’s why it’s called trail mix.


#6

Little known fact: it was first called “A Good Source of Calories for Ease of Transport and Room Temperature Storage.”


#7

I saw this on here or some other site the other day and thought it was a good idea.


#8

Huh, so that’s oat flour + Huel (or probably Soylent) + cacao + coconut + pecans + dates (which also make it sticky) + some salt. All blended together and made into little balls.

Sounds delicious, and seems like a good trail food to take Soylent and add some extra carbs + fats.


#9

yea I want to try it myself…