Dietary Fructose Causes Liver Damage, Primate Study Finds


#1

“What surprised us the most was how quickly the liver was affected and
how extensive the damage was, especially without weight gain as a
factor. Six weeks in monkeys is roughly equivalent to three months in
humans,” Dr Kavanagh said.


#2

I just read this while I was having breakfast, whats it have to do with soylent? the recipe carbohydrate source in maltodextrin and oat powder, glucose is not fructose.


#3

This firm’s version of soylent (i.e., complete meal replacement product) actually makes a feature of its fructose content! Could hardly believe it when I read the following blurb on their website:

NUTRALL is sweetened with fructose. This natural fruit sugar doesn’t have the same negative effects as glucose because it must pass through the liver before it can be utilized.


#4

A good variety of Oligosacharrides and let the body sort it out I say!


#5

Also says this in the article:

The high-fructose group’s diet was made from flour, butter, pork fat,
eggs and fructose (the main ingredient in corn syrup), similar to what
many people eat, while the control group’s diet was made from healthy
complex carbohydrates and soy protein.

The effects they observed could be due to the flour, the butter, lard or eggs. Who knows. Far too many differences between the test group and the control to make any reasonable conclusions.


#6

Yeah, “Healthy complex carbohydrates and soy protein” is really specific there, isn’t it?
The other diet sounds like pie to me. Flour, butter, lard, egg, sugars… that sure seems like a recipe for Mom’s Apple Death Pie. (I added the Death for effect.)

High-fructose corn syrup can have low but measurable levels of mercury as a residual from the catalytic process that is used to crack the starch into fructose. Because mercury is not easily cleared by the body, you can build up a rather high level of the stuff over time, especially if you get it from too many sources. The stuff is in practically every food product or snack product. This is the most credible complaint I’ve heard about HFCS and it’s been vehemently but unconvincingly denied or ignored by the HFCS supplier industry.

I would want to know what the source of their fructose was, and how they controlled for the factors in the flour, butter, lard, and eggs vs. the soy protein and “healthy but unspecified complex carbohydrates”.


#7

Not related to Soylent. This showed up in my feed, found it interesting and wanted people to see this. So bumping this up.


#8

The massive amount of fructose is hardly the only difference between the two groups:

The high-fructose group’s diet was made from flour, butter, pork fat, eggs and fructose (the main ingredient in corn syrup), similar to what many people eat, while the control group’s diet was made from healthy complex carbohydrates and soy protein.

  1. Fructose is not the main ingredient in corn syrup.
  2. These two groups had COMPLETELY different diets. The control diet was low in any sugars (<3% of cals), while the “fructose” diet was very high (25% from fructose alone). If they wanted to, they could have fed the control group flour, butter, pork fat, eggs and glucose.

In my opinion, the study only weakly reinforces the idea that excess fructose is bad for the liver, replicating a known result. The massive (apparently intentional) differences in diets makes any further detail ambiguous, so we can’t tell, for example, “how much” is “too much,” or even ascribe all of the problems seen to the fructose, itself.

(Link to the actual study.)


#9

It seems like the only new information this article is attempting to put forward is that excess fructose causes liver damage quickly. We already have plenty of good studies in which the only difference in diets is fructose that show that excess fructose over time can be damaging to the liver. Why on earth would they make such a difference in the diet? essentially renders the whole study invalid.


#10

I was not making the point you thought i was making. I just bumped it for people to read, thats all.


#11

I wasn’t responding to anything you said, nor to your post. I just saw this thread for the first time, because you bumped it, and so I looked at the study.