Do I have to brush my teeth if going Soylent 100%?


#1

Well, I had it once told to me that you should brush your teeth after every meal. That’s 3 times a day, which I always thought was ludicrous especially if you’re always on the go.

Given how bloody fast the bacteria and microbes and whatever else infest Soylent not left in the fridge I guess some sort of cleaning is mandatory lest you want your teeth to become an in vitro experiment.

But since everything is now liquid with Soylent there’s less concern about particles getting nudged between teeth. Maybe saliva throughout the day gets rid of most of the Soylent coated teeth? I’m wondering if anyone has an answer as to how much you can rationally ditch brushing one’s teeth. Maybe it can turn into a once a week thing?


#2

The American Dental Association recommends brushing your teeth at least twice a day.

I think brushing your teeth after breakfast and after dinner are pretty reasonable. I sometimes floss and often chew sugar-free gum throughout the day too, which might not do much, but it makes me feel better.


#3

You still have to brush your teeth. Soylent is just food. It is more ground up than the regular food you put in your mouth but it still gets stuck in there. I think it is better for your teeth since you don’t get chunks stuck between your teeth. I still feel build up on my teeth. I think my dental cleanings have been going better though. Just my 2 cents. I have no idea what I’m talking about. :smile:


#4

#5

@JeffLeBert @wezaleff

Well time to confess I’ve downgraded to brushing once a day for the last few months. I mean I don’t feel anything’s going wrong (yet).

Searches for validation that he is not the only one who does this and that obviously this isn’t just me developing an unhealthy lazy habit

(・_ ・:wink: … (゜_ ゜) … (._.)


#6

Floss twice a day. Brush at least every other, twice a day if possible. Brushing isn’t terribly important. Flossing is crucial.

Soylent contains ingredients that prevent tooth decay, one specifically being isomaltulose. It’s used widely in Japan.


#7

When I was a vegetarian I regularly skipped the morning teeth brushing and my dentist said that was fine based on the great state of my teeth. But soon after starting to eat meat again I had morning breath and now can’t go without brushing twice a day. As for soylent, I seem to remember a thread about someone actual having accelerated decay they thought was possibly due to the sugars and carbs in Soylent. So, I continue with the twice a day brushing for that reason and because the morning breath just isn’t going away.


#8

Brush once a day…preferably in the morning ( regardless of the diet you eat…be it meat, vegetarian or vegan), and wash your mouth anytime you eat/drink something (not sure if its necessary or not with soylent though), and floss once a week or if its not necessary then dont at all (as regular flossing could increase gaps between teeth) correct me if i am wrong about this.

@Sigerson, the morning breath not going away could also be because of lack of tongue cleaning (happened to me :smile:. I had a sensitive tongue and used to not prefer scraping it and that contributed to bad breath).


#9

My dental hygienist suggested that if I only brush once a day, that doing it before bedtime is the best time.


#10

It takes ~12 hours for bacteria to break down dentin so yea, after your last meal.

@Tark, the current consensus is that flossing is more important than brushing (in regards to frequency). There may be very new research that disagrees with this but I’m not sure. Flossing actually prevents receeding gums (and thus gaps). Gaps are most commonly from brushing too hard against the gum line.

Gums will naturally begin to recede around age 40, but there is research on preventing this (with wicked lasers!)


#11

My dentist suggested doing it after waking up is the best time. That is why i said that.

Anyway i suppose, for people…doing what their particular dental hygenist/ dentist said…is the best practice. Night or morning.


#12

Even if there are no food particles lodged between the teeth, biofilm will still grow.

Biofilm is the sticky, slippery surface that generally arrives in damp conditions after a day or two. It’s where bacteria live - that’s why flossing is so important

(oral irrigation is easier, faster and waay better than string flossing)


#13

I can confirm that it takes biofilm a day or two to develop.


#14

My grandpa and dad have both gotten one of those nifty spray brushes. I had no idea what it was for the longest time and now I want one!

Is it true you still have to floss even with one?


#15

Yeah the string is still needed to dislodge stubborn tartar. I’m currently trying the Oral-B flossing head and it seems to clean everything up nicely

Some Periodent in the oral irrigator should take of the tartar as well, doesn’t seem to be sold in europe yet.


#16

Isomaltulose leads to less tooth decay when you replace regular sugar with it. Isomaltulose doesn’t inherently prevent tooth decay; it’s removing the sucrose that helps.


#17

Just so this doesn’t persist, I don’t believe there is any truth to the above. There was a thread where someone had been to the dentist and after finding extreme recent decay, told them about Soylent, and their dentist freaked out and started tossing around accusations that it was Soylent’s fault. I don’t believe there has ever been any corroboration of this at all, and personally our own dental health improved dramatically after starting on Soylent (I’m willing to say it’s pure coincidence in both scenarios). I was concerned and discussed Soylent with our dentist, and she saw nothing wrong with it at all so long as regular dental practices were continued.

Speaking of which, I brush once a day when I remember to do so, and I don’t floss - ever. I don’t, I can’t, I won’t… despite being told to my entire life by every dentist I’ve ever see. I simply won’t do it because it accomplishes nothing since I can’t see what I’m doing with my hands in my mouth or fit them in there anyway so it’s pointless. I’ve had fairly crappy dental health my whole life, however I’ve also been told that I have unusually high levels of calcium in my saliva as well as overactive salivary glands (woohoo TMI!) so I believe those are to blame more than anything else. Since I went to cleanings every 4 to 6 months many years ago, my overall dental health has remained stable regardless of anything else, including Soylent.


#18

Used to have bad dental health too. Pre-diy-soylent I had the same problem with high levels of calcium in saliva. Something lessened this, I believe it’s the magnesium that’s been missing from my diet.

Have you tried smelling the string? (it smells like dog poo!) … You should only floss the teeth you wish to keep :smile:

Seriously, check out oral irrigators, It’s to flossing what soylent is to food :slight_smile: My hands don’t fit inside my mouth either and I’ve spent hours googling how to floss, hold the string etc. to no avail. Tried several brands of floss, little sticks pre-mounted with floss etc, my teeth just shred them all.

I wish there was some kind of oral probiotic mouthwash. :smiley:


#19

I’m with you on that one. That’s something I could see myself using! Heck it probably exists. Teh interwebz seem to think so…

https://duckduckgo.com/?q=probiotic+mouthwash

an irrigator is probably not a bad idea either, though I’d still have to remember to use it just like brushing. I tend to stay up each night until I basically fall down, so by the time I’m finally about to “go to bed” I’m barely conscious enough to stumble down the hall let alone brush/whatever.


#20

Ah good, because I was about to get all concerned, thanx :relieved: