Ethics of Soylent


#1

This is a question for Rosa Labs: What are the ethical ramifications of Soylent? For me, it’s huge that I’m not eating (as much) meat. I know a lot of others have their own requirements- gluten-free, soy-free, cruelty-free, vegan, vegatarian, etc. I’m not interested in debating the merits of those diets. Rather, I’m trying to compile a list of talking points that I can use to convince others to try Soylent.

Beyond diet, though, there are other considerations such as intellectual property. (This is very important to me as a programmer) Under what license does Soylent fall? It would be awesome if we could classify the recipe itself under the Gnu license.

If we are going to push Soylent to it’s full potential, we need to know that for today and forever after, Soylent remains an ethical product.


#2

I know it’s a much lower carbon footprint than all the frozen foods I was eating before. That of itself is huge.


#3

There’s an awful lot less physical waste generated from packaging, by Soylent consumption. Also we consume less water and electricity from washing fewer dishes/less frequently…


#4

Ethics don’t really play a big role for me in choosing Soylent.

One thing I will say is that it takes almost 1 month to generate enough garbage to fill an average kitchen garbage bag (compared to filling the same amount in about a week previously).

Also, I only make a trip to the supermarket about one a month now (There is no real saving for me in the travel/gas because I would have shopped on the way home from work). But there are a lot of little extras that you end up throwing in your cart that can add up price wise when you shop often.

The new packaging is much better than it was before (less wasteful). I still think the packaging is a little bigger than it needs to be.


#5

One of your “talking points” could be that Soylent tastes just like chicken!..If you put chicken in it…:slight_smile:

HAPPY FRIIIIIIIDAY!


#6

That makes you wonder about a lot of things. You take chicken for example, maybe they couldn’t figure out what to make chicken taste like, which is why chicken tastes like everything…
~Mouse


#7

Off-topic, the guy that played Mouse also played Elan Sleazebaggano in Star Wars Episode II, the guy that tried to sell “death sticks” to Obi Wan. Between the death sticks and the woman in the red dress, this guy knows ethics.

On-topic, I don’t see the point of this. What do you mean by “push Soylent to it’s full potential” and how will a GNU license help accomplish that?


#8

If there was a version of Soylent that included animal parts in it, I would use that variant, simply to assert my dominance over nature.


#9

Sleazebaggano??? You have got to be kidding. Then again I never watched beyond episode 1 because it was so terrible. So I guess anything is possible…


#10

You should see that terrible cgi cartoon where Darth Maul comes back with robo-spider-legs.


#11

With a GNU license we would get the “sorce code” for Soylent and could either make our own or improve the recipe and sell it or the recipe itself. Any derivative of the original recipe would also be bound by the GNU license. This could result in a better product for us all. Think about People Chow. The recipe is freely available and people have copied and modified to their hearts content. Some for the better some not so much.


#12

A GNU license would ensure that the recipe is never a secret. It would mean that anybody could see the recipe and that anyone is free to modify the recipe, assuming that their modifications were also classified under the GNU license.