Finding the Supercarb


#1

In the interest of not feeding harmful microorganisms with soylent (I prefer to feed myself), I’ve put together a list of carbohydrates that (Usually harmful) bacteria prefer to ferment.

The best-case scenario, at least if you feel the same way about this as I do, would be to find a carbohydrate that isn’t catalysed into any of these sugars by the human body, but is still digestible… is this even possible, or is it the nature of the beast?

This list is essentially all common disaccharides and sugars.

Sucrose
Lactulose
Lactose
Maltose
Trehalose
Cellobiose
Kojibiose
Nigerose
Isomaltose
ß,ß-Trehalose
a,ß-Trehalose
Sophorose
Laminaribiose
Gentiobiose
Turanose
Maltulose
Palatinose
Gentiobiulose
Mannobiose
Melibiose
Melibiulose
Rutinose
Rutinulose
Xylobiose
D-psicose
D-fructose
D-sorbose
D-tagatose
D-Allose
D-Altrose
D-Glucose
D-Mannose
D-Gulose
D-Idose
D-Galactose
D-Talose


#2

I have a lot of complaints about carbohydrates. Maltodextrin is too fast; I get hungry a couple hours after I eat it. Starch (as found in grains), on the other hand, isn’t even properly digestible. Cooking helps with this, but not completely. Lately I’ve been living on this – bread plus supplements – and also eating other food. I’ve gotten issues with excess stomach acid, and I believe this is due to my digestive system being overworked digesting all that starch.

So maltodextrin is too fast, and starch is too hard to digest. I’d like to try amylopectin (usually sold as waxy maize starch); that might be the ideal solution. Incidentally, I believe it breaks down into glucose, which might be a good one from a bacteria-growth standpoint. (Do you know?)

Really I’m just frustrated with carbs. I’m tempted to go ketogenic again, but drinking all that oil was just disgusting.


#3

Yeah my stomach gets upset if I put anything starchy in it, on the other hand my body doesn’t seem to adjust to a ketogenic diet, I get really cold and yeah, the oils taste disgusting.

Lmao, you have to buy opti-women multivitamins? Well, it’s doing wonders for your hair lol.

Wow that is an awesome recipe. Much easier to get down than what I’m making now. Even though it would put the cost up I would probably use more flaxseed oil and less olive oil to get the n-3/n-6 ratio closer to 1:1 though.

Here’s your answer:
“Amylases find use in breadmaking and to break down complex sugars, such as starch (found in flour), into simple sugars. Yeast then feeds on these simple sugars and converts it into the waste products of alcohol and CO2.”

Amylase is the enzyme that breaks down starches (and amylopectin).

And starch is apparently just amylopectin + amylose.

I was honestly thinking about just compressing the soylent ingredients into pills to take about once every 15 minutes (assuming 50 pills and eating from 8 AM to 8 PM), because it’s just so difficult to make a tasty soylent, I’m going to make a post about it once I try.

I think you honestly might have to go with a mix of sugar alcohols and increase the amount of fat and protein. That’s probably what I’m going to try.

Alcohols tend to have transient negative effects in large doses though. For instance, ethanol gets you drunk, and methanol makes you blind.


#4

Lmao, you have to buy opti-women multivitamins?

See here for why. (tl;dr: it’s the only completely complete multivitamin I know to exist.)

Well, it’s doing wonders for your hair lol.

Thank you. :slight_smile:

Wow that is an awesome recipe. Much easier to get down than what I’m making now. Even though it would put the cost up I would probably use more flaxseed oil and less olive oil to get the n-3/n-6 ratio closer to 1:1 though.

Thanks! It is easy to get down (and very easy to prepare), but the stomach acid issue has been a killer one lately.

“Amylases find use in breadmaking and to break down complex sugars, such as starch (found in flour), into simple sugars. Yeast then feeds on these simple sugars and converts it into the waste products of alcohol and CO2.”

Yeah, taking amylase might be the answer. I already have a high-amylase digestive enzyme supplement on hand, so I’d just have to start taking it. Apparently I need it to break down amylopectin as well? That’s a drag. Carbs are fucking frustrating!

I was honestly thinking about just compressing the soylent ingredients into pills to take about once every 15 minutes (assuming 50 pills and eating from 8 AM to 8 PM), because it’s just so difficult to make a tasty soylent, I’m going to make a post about it once I try.

I could see this working well. How are you going to save yourself the labor of making alllll those pills? I’d think you’d want a pill-making machine of some kind, otherwise I imagine the prep time would be completely unacceptable. Anyway, let me know how it goes; I’m interested!


#5

Once I actually understand the process I’ll probably make a large 2 piece mold and simply fill the molds and clamp it.

Amylopectin as a carb would work great in this situation, too; Assuming the pectin part of the name isn’t a misnomer it should help bind the materials.


#6

Don’t we also want to make sure we feed the useful microorganisms in our body as well?


#7

According to one of the blog posts by Rob, fiber is sufficient to do this.


#8

OP: I believe Palatinose is a trade name (like Hoover) and the more correct name to suit the rest of your list would be Isomaltulose.


#9

Wheat has been a terrible culprit for indigestion for a lot of people I know, myself included. If there’s any kind of digestive system distress, wheat is no good.


#10

So we know Sucrose is delicious but bad bad bad. We can’t use that. Isomaltulose/Palatinose may be a good option due to low GI, but some are put off by the fructose content.

Does anyone have any experiences or links relevant to the rest of the list?


#11

Do you have any info on the digestibility of starches? At the moment, I have sweet potato starch in my recipe and it makes me nervous, but I can’t use the grains, seeds or nuts that a lot of others are using. Wondering if I should just use the whole sweet potato and go with flour.


#12

Starch, the main carbohydrate in most grains, is semi-digestible to humans. That is to say, we can digest it, but with some difficulty and in limited quantities. This is part of why grains are usually cooked; it breaks down the starch, somewhat but not completely, making it easier to digest. Whether whole sweet potato is any better depends on what kinds of carbs sweet potatoes contain to begin with. If sweet potatoes have mostly starch, like most similar plants, then I wouldn’t expect it to make a difference. But maybe for example, as their moniker suggests, they also contain a lot of sugars, in which case the whole sweet potato would be more digestible than just the starch (here assuming also that the “sweet potato starch” is in fact mostly starch).


#13

[Another quick thought]

What about potato starch? I’ve personally lived on potatoes a couple days / weeks at a time.


#14

Why not just eat a digestive enzyme? http://www.betternutrition.com/enzyematichealth/columns/askthenaturopath/697

I’ve bought this http://www.amazon.co.uk/Quest-601451-Enzyme-180-Tablets/dp/B002BZOMPQ/ref=sr_1_1?s=drugstore&ie=UTF8&qid=1377288840&sr=1-1


#15

If it were broken down faster, it would simply become available for more aerobes. The idea is to find a carbohydrate that isn’t broken down into any of the above sugars in the stomach.


#16

the “supercarb” is organic quinoa mixed with organic avocados


#17

sounds super expensive

I give up on carbs…time to go ketogenic all the way :slight_smile:


#18

but it is whole fod

i agre need acai bery


#19

…and a new keyboard :stuck_out_tongue:


#20

no keybord has pescitcide