Forms of metals. Why Bisglycinate, Gluconate, Citrate?


#1

What happens to Bisglycinate and Gluconate in the stomach? The generally below neutral pH of the intestine makes it seem like they can’t be acting to trap metals, but what are they contributing, themselves?
Also, what happens to Citrate?
Other salts:
Nitrates are harmful.
Carbonates release CO2 which at these quantities does not seem to be a problem.
Is the problem that we raise the pH? Should we actually seek to raise the pH during the meal as we are using already digested components?
I do not understand the perils of using chlorides or sulfates to date, please someone point me in the direction of why that’s such an awful idea.


#2

The trouble with chloride is that it has valency -1, which means that with the transition metals that we need, it tends to turn up in three or four times the quantity of the metal. This is a problem when it comes to avoiding chloride overdose.
What’s your source on nitrates being harmful? They’re a key component of all proteins, and are the main constituent of fertiliser. Carbonates release CO2, yes, but relative to the rest of the body’s mechanisms for doing pretty much everything, that’s a really small amount, so you’re right that it’s not a problem.
I don’t know about the rest, but I suspect gluconate is just broken down and turned into protein. I got the impression that gluconate was used simply as a harmless way of getting metal ions into the body. Sulphates probably are unacceptable in the flatulence area.


#3

Are sulphates too inorganic to be consumed for the sulfur value? (secretly, I don’t know about the reason we need such a macroscopic amount in the first place, whole grams daily)
Nitrates aren’t essential in any amount, and the way our digestive system treats them has a route to carcinogens. Gluconate is actually a sugar acid, but my curiosity about it was because when used as a chelating agent to carry metals in supplements, it has a high % mass. The structure does seem to have only the most mundane groups though, so I am no longer worried about what happens to it.
Maxing out all the metals except the macro-metals of Calcium, Potassium and Sodium with chlorides doesn’t put much of a dent in the chlorine budget, not to mention the strange Chlorine requirements people assume @rob preaches right now, which I pointed out on this popular nutrient profile here.
What I originally created this post for was to see if as a community we know why these salts are used.

And the reason I started thinking about the salts is because of the various Phosphates of Potassium, which I am hoping to get evidence supply their full value of both Potassium and Phosphorus, and don’t have a digestive route or interaction with other substances that would make them harmful, as they actually provide the additional benefit of preventing microbial growth in fully prepared soylent.


#4

[quote=“qm3ster, post:3, topic:5302”]And the reason I started thinking about the salts is because of the various Phosphates of Potassium, which I am hoping to get evidence supply their full value of both Potassium and Phosphorus, and don’t have a digestive route or interaction with other substances that would make them harmful, as they actually provide the additional benefit of preventing microbial growth in fully prepared soylent.
[/quote]
Ah, you’ve exceeded my knowledge - although I was under the impression that the trouble with potassium phosphates was precisely that they chelate various important metals like zinc, such that we can’t extract them? Although that’s a discussion for this thread, and I’m not a chemist.


#5

@Smaug Sorry, I am confused. You linked to the post about Phytic acid, almost the only thread I am participating in now where I would still not have mentioned Potassium Phosphates.

I just think they might be a wonderful ingredient in even the official Soylent, as they are a known food preservative, but contain no detrimental parts like Nitrates, even if it can not fully be used to supplement both Phosphorus and Potassium.
In my mind that would allow adding things like Maltodextrin-trapped oils to the main powder, without inviting it to go bad in the same atmospheric conditions.

plus, As an already used preservative and not 2 supplements (each usually used at less the full diet requirement dosage) it seems it might be cheaper for bulk production (at no cost to quality)


#6

Oh dear, I was confused myself - sorry, I wrote that in a rush this morning :frowning: