Has Rosa Labs contacted the prison system yet?


#1

This one would be a good start.
Also, a lot of them are privately owned so…silver lining.


#2

Why suggest them to seek out new, high-volume customers when they aren’t yet able to meet the demand created just from their pre-release customers?


#3

You might want to tag @JulioMiles.
But I agree with @rcreencia, it’s better to wait for supply to be able to keep up with current demand before looking for a large buyer.


#4

Agree with the demand issue, but from a marketing stand point, many consumers might not want to eat the same food as prisoners. Targeting it to that market so soon out of the gate might not help build the brand that I’m sure Rob and team are going for.


#5

The average cost to feed an inmate per day is $2.30-$2.40. (Per day). This would almost triple the cost.


#6

They also might start using it as punishment http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nutraloaf


#7

Are we sure we want to start wacking the hornets nest just yet? Give em a taste, then take it away because of supply issues?

Maybe we need more reasons to upset the prison population as a whole, maybe we don’t…Wonder what a bag of “S” would go for on the inside…


#8

Not until they solve the mustard gas issue. Don’t want these guys begging for solitary.

Eve


#9

WOW!! Is Soylet as a punishment an image the team wants for their product?
LoL


#10

On the other hand, USA, the land of the free, has the largest prison population on the planet.


#11

Prisoners already sometimes have Nutraloaf on their plates, often as punishment.

I’d hate to see Soylent made an obligate food for anyone.


#12

the supply vs demand of soylent arent mismatched. it’s just about two years worth of demand. That doesn’t equate to actual current demand. I say they sign contracts with the military and prisons, and all the relief organizations they can.More money = more production.


#13

That would be just one more corporation profiting from the ridiculous U.S. prison system.


#14

Until sufficiently popular having most people’s connotation be associated with the prison network seems like a bad idea.

“Soylent? You mean that shit they feed to inmates?”


#15

More money, yes. But not enough money to meet that demand. I don’t think you understand how big the prison system is in the U.S. And how profit oriented (meaning they cut corners wherever they can). The money may seem like a lot, but not for the sheer amount of product that would be required in return. I can’t see Rosa Labs being able to upsize enough to meet this demand for at least a couple more years.

Also, I agree with everyone else in that I would consider Rosa Labs a “dirty” company if they helped support the prison complex.

Relief organizations are in the same position but with added difficulties with actually getting paid. And I’m not sure that Soylent is the proper product for famine relief. For one thing, I’m not sure that the places that it would go to would have the necessary supply of fresh water. If the water is not fresh, then you get a reprise of the baby formula scandal. Not something I want to be associated with either.

Military? Again the problem of fresh water. And it would have to be strictly voluntary I think. Those men and women have enough to put up with.

Eve


#16

But surely, there would be tremendous savings in the transportation, storing and preparation of all those dozens of bits of food that has to be dealt with on a daily basis. Just the expenditure on cooking and maintenance of the machinery on such a mass scale is huge.

Any private prison will see the benefit of Soylent in so many different ways.


#17

Oh, the prison will. But the prisoners won’t. You have to remember that a lot of the labour once the provisions get inside the walls is provided by the prisoners. It is a chance for many of them to do real work and that is a benefit. A slight one admittedly.

I don’t think that Soylent (or its competitors) would add to the culture of prisons. In fact, once this catches on, prisons are much more likely to go the cheap knock off route to bring the cost down to the normal monetary ration.

The real savings would be provided by the U.S. ceasing to be a prison state and not keeping people in prison for years and years for minor drug offenses (for instance).

Eve


#18

Of course, and all drugs and all drug trafficking must be made legal.
A person owns its own body and has the right to decide what to put in it, the state doesn’t own a person’s body and has no legitimacy in creating irrational laws to that effect.


#19

BEHOLD ANOTHER GLoRIOUS POST BY ME.

I can see it now! Prisoners lined up to fill their cups from a repurposed slurpee machine!
Or since soylent is soooo easily fermented, using it as a base in their toilet wine.
I insist on a new branding like “cell block D lent” or "free your body… But not really"
There could be special formulas like “Martha Stewarts camp cupcake crunch”.

Oh man! Can you imagine how poorly something once referred to as “semen-like” juice would go over there. Now we have prisoners who are rioting.

And I’m pretty sure the prisoners genetically destined to have the worst gas would immediately fill the medical ward. I can’t imagine that just being let slide by other prisoners.

Maybe instead of feeding it to them they could be leased to help with shipping. Lots of companies cut costs by getting prison labor.

Feels good doesn’t it?

We’re changing the world people! Making a difference one idea at a time.

What is that cat staring at!!!

Forgive me. I’m in wacky after-migraine mode.