How can whey protein be the only source in People Chow?


#1

I thought the body needed multiple sources of protein. Is this incorrect? Thank you


#2

I don’t know about the multiple sources thing, but the recipe gets just over a third of its protein from masa and a bit more from the multivitamin powder, so that’s three sources.


#3

That only applies if the protein source lacks the full assortment of amino acids. There is 10 of them that can not be synthesized by the body. Whey protein is a complete protein, meaning it has all the amino acids you need. And arguably one of the best quality proteins in terms of bio-availability, balance and completeness. It’s also one of the cheapest. The major cons is whey contains allergic components and contributes to some diseases - but you’ll find that no protein source is actually perfect. The rice protein in products like Soylent especially. :slight_smile:

More info: http://www.nutribodyprotein.com/protein-types.php


#4

I’m using a mix of whey & soy – mostly whey because I don’t like being able to actually taste the soy. In addition to having different amino acid profiles, other nutrients differ as well – whey concentrate has a good amount of calcium, and soy has a good amount of iron, for example.


#5

Whey has all the essential amino acids. Meat does as well.

It is just if your protein source is vegetables that it is suggested that you have multiple kinds since many plants are lacking in some amino acids. Soy protein is very low in methionine and cysteine, so if that is your protein source, you need something else to get enough methionine. Alternately, you could just have a higher percentage protein to make up for the low percentage methionine. This works for soy but maybe not other plant sources.


#6

It is also worth noting here that whey has a relatively high glycemic index/load so it may be worth combining with a slower digesting protein like casein.