How do I eat 2700 calories of Soylent per day?


#1

Since Soylent ships in one-fits-all 2010 calories per day, how do I consume more of it?

The micronutrients are all at 100 % levels with the consumption of 2010 Soylent calories.

Let’s say I consume 4 Soylent meals per day, that’s 2680 calories - but it’s 133 % of many vitamins and minerals and it’s 160 % calcium and iron. Such consumption must have negative effects?

I would suggest an individual bag of powdered micronutrients if there are problems with consuming 160 % of RDA for calcium and iron daily. Maybe it will be relevant when ( or if ) Soylent begins to offer personalized solutions.


#2

From the strictly anecdotal evidence I’ve seen amongst the DIY Soylent crowd, it actually seems like one may need to consume fewer “Soylent calories” than they would “normal food calories”. Initial appearances seem to be that the soylent calories are so much more fulfilling and satisfying that it takes fewer of them to get what the body needs. Of course this is entirely anecdotal and only time will tell what the real differences are between Soylent & solid food, but it’s certainly interesting to note.


#3

Come to think of it, I’m curious about the opposite question… how to consume less Soylent. I’m currently on somewhere around 1400 to 1600 calories daily, and as I understand it one pouch of Soylent = ~2000 calories. So do I just mix up the entire pouch and drink until I’m no longer hungry? Or do I need to measure out smaller portions and end up with small leftover amounts of powder that will carry over to the following day?


#4

Very interesting indeed. But I’d be worried about the difference between personal experience and objective measurement. I am quite confident that I could not live off 2010 calories per day, and I’d like to have the option of consuming Soylent exclusively on most days.


#5

Well 2 meals of Soylent is 1340 calories. But yeah, maybe just consume till you feel full.


#6

Currently this sounds like the prevailing opinion, yes. I can go link the article if need be, but I believe it was the Ars Does Soylent series, part 3 or 4, where Rob stated that there was enough flex room that you should be able to just rely on your natural hunger mechanisms and be fine for micros.

As far as the excess Soylent, since it keeps for a day or two, you should be able to just keep the leftover in the fridge and use it first the next day. One could reasonably assume that by doing this each day (having part “leftover” and part “new” soylent), every few days you’d end up with a full day’s worth left over, and you could skip making the “new” batch for that day.


#7

Yep, that’s pretty much what I’ve been imagining will happen. Can’t wait to find out first hand!


#8

I can’t wait either! Maybe my problem will solve itself if it shows that I only like eating Soylent for 3 out of the 4 meals I eat per day.


#9

Yep… who knows, you might actually discover that with Soylent, ~2000 calories per day is just right. Ultimately our bodies will (hopefully! =) tell us what we need. That’s actually my one semi-paranoid fear - that Soylent might be so “filling” and “satisfying” that our personal biochemistry could be lacking something, and we don’t realize it because we aren’t hungry or craving any in particular, resulting in nasty side effects. Logically I think this is unlikely, but my mind is racing with “what ifs” since I haven’t gotten to try this yet. It just can’t get here soon enough! LOL


#10

160% of a vitamin isn’t going to hurt you. If it did you wouldn’t be able to buy ice cream or milk from the grocery store because it’d be too dangerous. Everyone is getting too much and too little of any given micronutrient all the time in their lives and life goes on.

Also the RDI’s are not one size fit all. They assume an average person that needs 2k calories a day. If you need to eat less, you probably need less iron, calcium and so on. If you’re a bigger guy and need to eat more you probably need more micro nutrients as well.

That said there are certain nutrients you’re always going to need to supplement. If you’re a child bearing age woman I think you need folic acid supplements. As you age you may need calcium. Certain meds can also mean you need to take more of certain supplements. So treat Soylent as a nice healthy baseline food.


#11

I have heard of this concern before. I don’t think it’s warranted though. What would we need? I am pretty confident that we know what’s essential and what’s not.

I do the same thing with regards to making up what-if scenarios, haha. One thought I have is to engineer a more perfect Soylent in the future by going down to the cellular level. It would allow us the get rid of the trace amount of sugar, phytic acid, cholesterol, gluten and maybe further reduce saturated fat.


#12

I start to worry about over-optimization at that point. Are we curve-fitting our food? LOL


#13

I precisely wish to treat Soylent as a healthy baseline food. But 1600 mg of calcium every day may cause problems (based on the knowledge I just gathered from 10 minutes of browsing). I’m thinking about kidney stones and increased risk of heart attacks. On the other hand, the studies I read were investigating consumption of calcium in concentrated supplements, not mixed with other nutrients as in Soylent or other food.


#14

The NIH lists the upper safe limit for calcium at 2500mg. You’re probably looking at studies involved with supplements. That’s where people are taking calcium in addition to eating food with calcium in it. Soylent is giving you 1600mg of calcium as part of a 2700 calorie diet.

And remember those dailies and limits are averages. A small 90lb girl needs less calcium than a 250lb muscle head guy. And that’ll be reflected in the amount of calories per day they consume of Soylent.

You’re really way overthinking things.


#16

Just buy some maltodextrin or canola oil, and at this to the mix, until your calories are met. Cheap and easy.


#17

This is what I’m probably going to do. I’ll add 200 grams of oat powder.


#18

Not sure if that is the best idea. 200 gram of oats contain 10 mg of manganese. Consuming more than 11 mg per day of manganese could cause serious and harmful side effects.

Why not just add some empty calories such as maltodextrine? You already ingest enough of your other nutrients.

You can tweak a little bit with your calorie ratios. Some people prefer more carbs, some prefer more fat. I think that proteins are already solid.

The Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends this distribution for the energy nutrients:

  • Fat: 20 - 35% of total calories (average 30%)
  • Protein: 10 – 35% (average 15%)
  • Carbohydrates: 45 – 65% (average 55%)

#19

I’ll look into the manganese warning. The thing is, I’ve been eating 200 grams of rolled oats for breakfast for years. Do you thing the “packaging” of the manganese with fiber, fat and other nutrients hinder the manganese from causing harm, or is this bullshit?

I’d really like to add fiber along with complex carbs to the soylent - oat powder seems to fit this purpose.

With regards to the caloric ratios, that’a whole other discussion :slight_smile:


#20

Never heard about that. 200 gram of oats are just under the UL. But 200 grams on top of already 110 grams of oats, is more likely to cause problems.

I think there is plenty of fat and fiber already in soylent, to prevent maltodextrin from peaking your blood sugar too fast, if that is what worries you. You could add maltodextrin together with some oats (and maybe some canola oil). Just don’t add too much oats I would say.


#21

That is my worry yes. And I think you’re right, there is a lot of fiber and fat in just Soylent alone. Maybe I’ll go with maltodextrin.