How does it taste?


#1

Is it tasty? Bland? Or do you have to hold your nose to choke it down?

Do you flavor it with fruit juice, or chocolate syrup, or something else?

(Placed my initial order a couple days ago… wondering what to expect.)


#2

It’s freaking delicious. My first taste wasn’t quite as good because I was way too impatient and didn’t let it sit and chill for a while. That definitely helps with the texture, if you just mix & drink immediately it can be quite powdery.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hE_xcet6es

My mother-in-law (who had never heard of it and knew nothing about it) tried some and her immediate reaction was that it was delicious and she asked if it was chocolate flavored. It doesn’t taste chocolatey to me at all so that was an interesting observation, I think she just didn’t have any other bucket in her brain for the taste. But she couldn’t stop commenting with every drink on how good it was.

Oh and I don’t flavor it at all anymore, I experimented with my first batch but found that frankly I like it much better just straight.


#3

*People tend to find the taste of Soylent to be familiar: the predominant sensation is one of doughiness. The liquid is smooth but grainy in your mouth, and it has a yeasty, comforting blandness about it. I’ve heard tasters compare it to Cream of Wheat, and “my grandpa’s Metamucil.” I slurped a bit, and had the not unpleasant sensation that I was taking sips from a bowl of watered-down pancake batter.


#4

In “The VICE Guide to North Korea,” there is a description of what the food is like in a fine restaurant there:

“They give you about three or four courses of absolutely inedible food. It’s just matter. It’s like fried … matter.”

That is what I’m anticipating. Thinking it might need some ketchup or Kahlua or Brawndo or something.


#5

In addition to taste, know that there have been ongoing shipping challenges (lots of discussion on the forum) and that when you do finally get your shipment you may want to account for some transition side-effects (http://discourse.soylent.me/t/offical-soylent-should-it-be-producing-mustard-gas/12660).


#6

Hey man I just finished watching some of these blog posts and they are really great. You should definitely keep posting them.


#7

Thanks, I definitely am. Though I’m moving the more minor random bits that happen every day to Twitter, and saving the videos for more substantial updates.


#8

Soylent tastes like vaguely sweet liquid bread. Sort of yeast-y or flour-y—I guess that’s is the best way to describe it. Maybe a teeny bit of earthiness. And behind it all, the very vague sweetness. The sweet tastes more artificial than natural—more like aspartame than sugar, I guess, but that’s not quite right. It’s just like faintly sweet bread.

The 0.8 Beta formula I consumed for a full week was extraordinarily gritty and silty, but the 1.0 mix should have that taken care of (in fact, one of the major delays with shipping 1.0 was acquiring the fine-grained rice protein necessary to eliminate that chalky grittiness).

The taste has a long finish and it lingers, but it’s pretty neutral. I did the last few days of mine with about a capful of vanilla extract per 2 liters of soylent, and it made a nice change.


#9

I’ll keep vanilla in mind when I’m finally able to taste the stuff.

I’m curious: Why would acquiring the fine-grained rice protein be a problem? I assume all the ingredients you guys use are also used in existing products that you would find in a grocery store. Was the delay due to testing several different variants, or to actually sourcing the rice protein you settled on?

I love the way this stuff is tracked like a piece of software, with beta versions, and calling the current Soylent “1.0.” lol


#10

Rice protein is very gritty/chalky. They settled on a new to the market product that is extremely fine and greatly reduced the chalkiness, thereby improving the texture overall and making the drink much more acceptable for the masses. Good move IMHO.

The issue is that they are the first company to actually buy and use this new protein, and the manufacturer had not yet scaled up their production and was unable to supply the protein as early as expected.


#11

i can say DO NOT MIX SOYLENT WITH WATER WITH GAS, TASTES LIKE SHIT


#12

I wouldn’t recommend mixing anything you eat with gas. That’d probably kill you.


#13

This was the subject of repeated Soylent blog posts (see here, for example). The particular type of protein settled on by Rob & the Soylent folks ended up being problematic to buy in quantity due to a bunch of different factors. Chiefly, there was a dip in global rice availability, and this particular protein is only produced by a single company that has a patent on the process for getting the rice protein particle size so tiny. Because the protein was sole-sourced, there was no alternative vendor to go to, and Soylent got pushed. A lot.

Alternatives existed, but they would have been less-fine and would have made the texture of the final product unacceptably chalky. I know if 1.0 had had the consistency of 0.8, I wouldn’t be buying—some folks liked it fine, but to me it felt like coating my throat with river silt (and the silty chalkiness would linger for almost an hour).


#14

http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/petrolent

(EDIT: be sure to read the notes)


#15

W. T. F.

Wow that’s… just so wrong.


#16

Relax. I’m 99% sure he meant gas is in a state of matter.

Such as Carbonated Water.

Let’s all think for 5 seconds before we assume lol.

@Myarter @Joshua @tsarna @vanclute


#18

Ah so he meant to say “do not carbonate Soylent”?


#19

LOL I did… wow. The fact that those are even necessary say… something.


#20

“and this particular protein is only produced by a single company that has a patent on the process for getting the rice protein particle size so tiny.”

Wow. That’s a little scary, isn’t it? I hope there are plans in place should the single source of this protein go under.


#21

That’s when you buy the rights to the patent or something and produce it yourself.