How much does a full Takeya pitcher weigh?


#1

If anyone has a scale that can weight down to a few pounds, I would love to know what a full Takeya pitcher of Soylent weighs. I don’t know if Soylent version matters, probably not a large amount I would guess.

I’d find out myself but our scale won’t reliably measure below 10 pounds.

Thanks in advance to whoever! =)


#2

(You + full pitcher) - you = full pitcher.


#3

This gave me an idea. How about somebody make an app that when downloaded can make a smartphone a weighing machine for small stuff a few pounds worth. I have no CS/hardware engineering background, so if anybody here has it, how does this idea sound? Is an app enough, or should there be any hardware or sensor added to it? A weight sensor perhaps?


#4

You’d need hardware. A phone can work as a thermometer but only because all electrical equipment has meters to tell when it’s getting too hot. Weighing something with one will likely Crack your screen, unless you’re weighing out a dub sack or something.


#5

even something a couple a pounds worth?


#6

Regardless, a standard phone doesn’t have sensors for weight. Not yet anyway.


#7

To weigh things, you really want a scale.

I have a postal scale, but I let someone else have my Takeya pitcher, because I wasn’t using it.


#8

About 5 pounds, depending on how far you fill the pitcher. I always leave mine a few ounces shy…


#9

My Takeya pitcher weighs 343g when empty and 2,467g when full (to the bottom of the green portion of the pitcher) for a Soylent (v1.0) batch weight of 2,124g.


#10

OK so a bit more than 5 pounds. Perfect, thanks!

Good point, but our scale is also only accurate to +/- a pound or so easily at any given time so… wouldn’t work real well for this particular calculation.


#11

Am really curious why the question…


#12

Oh… lol Nothing terribly interesting really. I was discussing the glass frigovere pitcher with someone, and my immediate concern was with the weight of it being a bit too much for my gal to comfortably maneuver. He weighed a full pitcher and it came in at 7.25 pounds full, and my benchmark for what she could comfortably handle is a gallon of milk, which is apparently about 8 pounds. So in that respect, the glass pitcher is probably fine.

My second concern though was with the shaking while mixing Soylent. If the glass pitcher was significantly heavier, I’d be worried about throwing my back out shaking it up as I’ve been wrestling with a major recurrence of back troubles the last 3 months or so. Sounds like the glass pitcher is indeed significantly heavier and would be similar to shaking a gallon of milk… which I’m not sure I’d feel good about doing in my present state.

So there ya have it. Sorry the answer isn’t a bit more intriguing. LOL


#13

Being a windbag, I always seem to have something to add -

I don’t know where your back problem is, but I got a couple of herniated discs in my neck many years ago and have had to deal with that and work around it at times when I had flareups.

Pro tip: shaking up and down is stressful on the spine and can set off my problem.
Instead, try grabbing the top and bottom but hold it sideways, and shake sideways.

I can get a lot of hip action going (counter-motion to the shaking), but it didn’t set off my spinal problem, even while I was having a flare-up. YMMV, so start gently if you have a lower back problem, but for all I know, this will actually be therapeutic.


#14

Addendum - I wasn’t shaking a 2-liter pitcher back then, just a regular shaker cup, which would still set off my neck if I shook vertically. I haven’t had a flareup for years before starting Soylent, so I haven’t actually felt what happens with a big bottle - but it does feel very different shaking horizontally versus vertically.


#15

Yeah for me twisting is actually one of the worst things. Also I have to really be careful if I have a weight in my hands and extend my arms far from my body. That’s very very bad.

I don’t know exactly what the issue is, since I haven’t had an MRI or anything. But I have slight scoliosis (thanks Mom!) as well as possibly some residual issues from an accident when I was a kid. It mostly doesn’t bother me but I sit way, way, WAY too much (like for years I’ve been sitting probably 10 hours a day on a light day, 12-16 on heavier days… NOT good) and that’s probably the prime culprit. I appear to have a pinched nerve, possibly a slightly bulging disc. Fortunately chiropractic has been helping a ton, as has getting a sit/stand desk (motorized) so I don’t sit for long at a stretch now. Standing now in fact… I love this desk.

Thanks for the suggestion though! Myself I’ve found that fast but small motions, being careful to move primarily only my arms and try to “shock absorb” the motion so little travels to the rest of my torso, works quite well. I don’t do much side-to-side shaking anymore as it was too problematic.


#16

Congrats on the standing desk - I had replaced my expensive office chair with a $20 fit ball (extra heavy duty, in professional-looking black), and my spine felt far less stiff after long sessions at the desk. The stillness of sitting in a chair at a desk is not good for us.

On shaking with your problem - rough. With my issue, I could hold somethign fairly heavy no problem, close to body or not - but I couldn’t lift something of 5 pounds over shoulder level. Spinal problems are all very different.

I imagine the second-safest thing for you is to shake it vertically, but to keep the bottle very close to your body; this will help limit the amount of shaking getting into your body and keep the work in the arms.

I think the safest thing would be an immersion blender! I use one now for the blending, and only use shake the bottle to get rid of settling between drinks, which doesn’t take nearly as much work as the initial blend.

Good luck with things.


#17

I’ll mention that, with my Frigoverre, I use a whisk for the initial mixing (with the pitcher 2/3 - 3/4 full of Soylent and water). Just takes a little extra shake when topped off and sealed.

I use a flat whisk because it’s fast to brush and rinse when I’m done.

Works really well. You couldn’t do it with a tall Takeya.


#18

Yep that’s about right. Though horizontal shaking is OK provided I don’t twist a bunch.

[quote]I think the safest thing would be an immersion blender! I use one now for the blending, and only use shake the bottle to get rid of settling between drinks, which doesn’t take nearly as much work as the initial blend.
[/quote]

Yeah probably true, but the nuisance factor of pulling out, plugging in, using, cleaning, and storing another appliance that would ONLY be used for mixing Soylent - when shaking works perfectly well for us - keeps me from wanting to bother. We don’t even have a full size blender and the tiny one we DO have, kindof annoys me how it takes up counter space and barely ever gets used. But, glad we have it on those occasions it does get use.

[quote]Good luck with things.
[/quote]

Thanks, I’m definitely on the mend, I just have to be careful not to overdo the sitting and various other activities (like crawling around beneath a desk wiring up equipment… not good!


#19

You don’t need to plug this in. Or this, but I like the ease of cleaning of the first one.


#20

Yeah if I was gonna use a manual whisk, I already could. Not gonna do that to my wrist or spend the time… again, shaking works perfectly, never had any trouble with that at all (other than needing to learn not to shake my entire body so much).