How much EPA and DHA in soylent 2.0?


#1

Not sure if it’s been asked before, but I couldn’t find the information in the various pdf’s I tried to read.

If I go 100% soylent, should I stop taking omega 3 supplements? On average I take 800 mg EPA and 400mg DHA per day in the form of fish oil capsules/softgels.


#2

tagging @Conor to see if he might know


#3

Soylent (drink and powder both) contains omega 3 and 6, if I recall they do provide sufficient DHA but don’t provide EPA, rather ALA which our body can turn into EPA. It’s not perfect though as the ALA to EPA conversion rate is not good, but you probably aren’t missing too much. <-- this info is as related to 1.5, for 2.0 I remember hearing them say the omega 3 and 6 amounts have been increased for a “more robust” fatty acid profile. I don’t know if that means 2.0 now includes EPA or just higher amounts of DHA and ALA.


#5

I have read the EPA is unstable in powdered form, so i am guessing it can be added to 2.0. If they manage to do that, they can skip ALA.


#6

It has been asked, by myself and someone else on another thread. We never got an answer. Seems you have 2 answers here so far that, personally, I don’t have much confidence in the “I heard”, “I recall”, “I remember” answers.


#7

Basically it seems like I should continue consuming my fish oil supplements.


#8

The answer I gave for 1.5 is correct. You can see it on their nutrition formula PDF, which inq linked for a hot second. I don’t think the 2.0 nutrition PDF has been provided yet, so @Conor it would be nice to have :smile:


#9

Just read story on the genetics involved with The Inuit and their ability to metabolize Omega 3… Interesting…


#10

There are 3 kinds of omega 3…ALA,EPA,DHA. Well EPA and DHA are technically metabolites of ALA, but for the sake of this discusssion lets assume these are three kinds. Taking ALA wont do much prevent or reduce the incidence of heart attacks and strokes, as only a very very tiny amount of it gets metabolised to EPA. Taking DHA doesnt do it either, as it wont prevent the formation of the heart unhealthy AA (to my knowledge).

DHA helps the brain not the heart!

That leaves EPA. ‘‘EPA’’ is the one among omega 3’s that can reduce heart disease not ALA and to my knowledge not even DHA. As it is the one that competes with omega 6’s for the same enzymes.

But…

the consumption of EPA should be enough to do that!! Atleast half as much EPA as omega 6’s need to be consumed.

Also EPA only helps with regard to omega 6 consumption like i said above. But heart disease is also caused by other fats like trans, long-chain saturated and other non-fat things like cadmium and low HDL. EPA obviously doesnt help with these significantly as it doesnt compete with these for absorption or remedy these significantly enough to affect outcomes.

Any corrections to my points are welcome.

This is why fish oil pills doesnt always help, not because they are not effective. A bullet proof jacket doesnt help with death by stabbing, doesnt mean it is not effective for any attacks on your life.

Edit: One more thing. I have another theory as to why fish oil pills arent helping outcomes. Omega 3’s (all three of them ) are very susceptible to oxidation when exposed to heat and light… more than sat fat and mono are and probably more than even omega 6. Fish oil pills are often exposed to these in factories and stores/ homes. And when they oxidise their ‘health benefits’ reduce.


#11

Studies of ALA metabolism in healthy young men indicate that approximately 8% of dietary ALA is converted to EPA… In healthy young women, approximately 21% of dietary ALA is converted to EPA

Can’t say I’d agree that 8%-21% is a “very very tiny amount”.


#12

In men the conversion rate is 8%. And isnt 8% a tiny amount?

Also there are studies which shows even lesser conversion than that.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9637947n that.

http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/83/6/S1467.full


#13

10-20% is a significant amount; it’s ten to twenty per cent.

The question is how much EPA we need, how much EPA is ideal, and how much ALA we’re consuming that can be converted. (After all, 10-20% of what?)

The research goes on.

Meanwhile, fish oil is easy and cheap for me to take, the current evidence is pretty favorable, and the risks and costs are low. There’s not much oxidation inside of gel caps, and I keep the bottles sealed. I’ll just keep taking the fish oil.


#14

Which brand of fish oil do you take, @MentalNomad ?

I had heard that some brands were better than others for things like heavy metals.


#15

One more thing. I have another theory as to why fish oil pills arent helping outcomes. Omega 3’s (all three of them ) are very susceptible to oxidation when exposed to heat and light… more than sat fat and mono are and probably more than even omega 6. Fish oil pills are often exposed to these in factories and stores/ homes. And when they oxidise their ‘health benefits’ reduce.

Yea you have to look for high quality fish oil pills. Look for “pharmaceutical grade” or ask the pharmacist for the highest quality brands they recommend.

If you get disgusting fishy burps then certainly the oil has gone rancid and you should throw it out and get a better one.


#16

My intention was not to talk people out of taking fish oil pills. I was responding to a link in the nyt article by greg h, that seem to suggest fish oil pills dont prevent/reduce cardiac disease or stroke incidence.

Taking fish oil pills is definitely helpful.

But where did you get that 10-20% conversion rate, from?


#17

I’m just making round numbers. The point is that these numbers are not necessarily that small; a percentage conversion rate is only meaningful in context of the quantity in the centage.

And I didn’t mean to imply any commentary about your statement other than what I just said above.

This is something I haven’t paid much attention to, but I probably should. I currently have two sources: I buy LEF’s Mega EPA/DHA when it’s on sale, otherwise I buy Costco Kirkland Signature Fish Oil. The costs are very, very clost when you calculate cost per unit of EPA/DHA. (You need 5 of the Kirkland “1000 mg of fish oil” gelcaps to get 1250 mg of EPA+DHA, whereas 2 of the LEF “1000 mg of fish oil” gelcaps give you 1200 mg of EPA+DHA.)


#18

But isnt it more helpful to take EPA directly if we want EPA than take ALA when only 20% of it or even as low as 6% is converted to EPA.


#19

Someone on reddit said they got an email from Soylent answering this question with: no EPA or DHA at all in S 2.0, only ALA.


#20

That’s a little unexpected. Any update on the spreadsheet release @Conor for 2.0?


#21

We are working on it. :smile: