How to clean the official pitcher


#1

Since I don’t have a dishwasher, I fill the pitcher with water & dish soap and then rinse. I’ve tried many times, the pitcher looks very clean, but I can’t get rid of the soylent smell. Is it normal? Is it safe to continue using it to prepare another pouch of soylent?


#2

To really clean it thoroughly you have to disassemble the top, take out the gaskets, and wash each part separately. Otherwise some soylent can stay stuck in different crevices.

I have a dishwasher but I never used it for the pitcher. I usually just do a rinse, then once in a while do the full breakdown and wash.


#3

I always disassemble and clean each part separately, cannot make the pitcher odorless.


#4

Baking soda + Vinegar is godly for everyday household cleaning. I’d imagine it may do well if you put a mixture in your pitcher for an hour then rinse it out VERY well.


#5

Just to be clear, there are 5 total piece to clean.

The black top with ‘Soylent’ printed on it.
The black middle part that is attached to the handle.
2 white gasket around the top and middle piece.
And the main clear container.

There are also a lot of threads for things to be caught in. So you want a brush of some kind. A sponge won’t get in the threads that well.


#6

There’s a second white gasket on the very top piece.


#7

Step 1: Throw away pitcher
Step 2: Buy a better container

Seriously though, its a real pain to clean.
Its all plastic, so if you left old soylent in it too long the smell will never come out.
Also, as other mentioned, make sure you are taking it COMPLETELY apart. Its not obvious that the lid breaks down into multiple pieces and old soylent can get caught inside.

I highly recommend glass if possible, a wide mouth, and using a whisk to mix. It will make your daily Soylent experience so much better.

The simplest solution is a large jar.
For an in between (but still too many pieces maybe…) This is the best I have found so far:


This glass pitcher seals with a vacuum. Making it nice for shaking/transporting.
It has a wide mouth and is more compact than the extra long soylent pitcher.


#8

I second this. I bought two of these for $9.95 each at The Container Store. Love the glass instead of plastic. I use an immersion blender to mix so it takes almost no time and there are no lumps.


#9

You’re right. I think I’m gonna go with glass. But I have one concern. The one you recommended is heavier than my laptop. Is it slippery? Is it fragile? How easy is it for shaking?


#10

I had the same problem, and so did others. It appears to be virtually impossible to clean out all the residue and leave it completely odorless. So I tossed it, and now I use a large mason jar. Plastic retains odors more than glass does, that is just how it is. Actually what I do most of the time now is make 2 servings at a time in a blender (with a banana or two, and some additional flavors - yum, the best tasting Soylent ever!), then transfer it to stainless steel bottles.


#11

Glass is obviously heavier than plastic, but it is not that much more. I think most of the weight is the water. I’m a reasonably healthy, not particularly strong, male and had never even thought about how heavy the container was. The Bormioli pitcher is not fragile. I’ve have been using two since I started using Soylent when it shipped and DIY before. Recently the rubber gasket broke on one and I dropped another and chipped the edge. It didn’t break, just chipped. So, I’m pretty happy with how sturdy they are.

I like the shape of the Bormioli pitcher much better for shacking and blending. I use an immersion blender and I can easily blend to the bottom of the pitcher.

You can probably get these pitchers locally so get one, try it, and you will probably like it.


#12

Thank you for the information. Greatly appreciated.


#13

I’ve been using those pitchers since 1.0–was probably the first one to post about them here–and they’ve been working great for me for years.

I clean them in the dishwasher (I have four, so by the time I’ve used them all I have a full dishwasher). Like the official pitcher, it requires some dismantling of the lid, which is in four parts: two pieces that screw together, a bit on top that locks them together, and a rubber gasket. I put the plastic bits on the top racks, except the little one that I put in the closed silverware cage. (You could get by without washing it–it doesn’t come in contact with the pitcher’s contents, unless you’ve tossed the whole thing in the sink before dismantling.)


#14

I bought that one, it is great if you never have to pour anything out of it. you have to remove the whole top to poor anything and you have soylent all over the lid. I end up rinsing the lid every time i pour out some soylent. its a good container, vacuum sealed lid but its awful as a whole lol


#15

I don’t find it that awkward to take off the lid and put it (upside down) on the counter while I pour a glass.


#16

I’ve never found washing the pitcher to be any different than washing normal stuff to be honest. I’ve never had the luxury of owning an automatic dishwasher, so I just fill half the sink up with warm/hot soapy water, submerge the pitcher (while separated), and scrub. I’ll usually do the rest of the dishes at the same time.

Alternatively, if I’m feeling lazy, I’ll just fill the pitcher up with hot soapy water, shake really hard for a minute, and then rinse.

The only hard part to scrub is the inner rim of the handle piece. It helps if you can spray that with water or have small fingers.


#17

I use mine for pouring oil/gas mixtures into our chainsaws. (usually 1:50)