How to prevent coagulating?


#1

I’ve been making my DIY soylent linked below and it tastes great, like a sweet chocolate milkshake. I mix no more than half a days serving with 0.5 litre of water and right after blending it’s perfectly drinkable however after a few minutes it starts to coagulate to the point where it isn’t drinkable and is more like a thick sludge.

Any ideas on how to prevent this?

http://diy.soylent.me/recipes/diy-soylent-2


Oat Flour turns into an undrinkable paste
#2

I think this is likely due to the psyllium husk powder in the recipe.
I use psyllium husk powder but not in my soylent recipe, I usually mix it with some orange or cranberry juice and drink it right away followed by a glass of water each morning. If you let the psyllium husk powder sit in liquid for any time it soaks it up and gets gelatinous.
You could try cutting back on the amount you use or try and find a different fiber source.

-Mark


#3

Mine does this too, but never before I started experimenting with Psyllium husk. So @markdan is probably right.

I usually just water it down more or eat it with a spoon like jello.


#4

I hear vampire bat saliva prevents coagulation.


#5

In the food industry, this is called caking. There are several anti-caking agents available.

From here:
http://www.understandingfoodadditives.org/pages/ch2p7-1.htm

One of the most important anti-caking agents is silicon dioxide (E551). It is manufactured to have physical properties that are tailored to meet the food producer’s specific requirements. Other manufactured anti-caking agents include: calcium silicate (E552), sodium aluminosilicate (E554) and dicalcium phosphate (E341). Natural products such as talc, kaolin, potato starch and microcrystalline cellulose (E460) are also used.

Silicon Dioxide can be easily purchased in bulk. It’s also known as diatomaceous earth.


#6

Mark was bang on with the psyllium husk powder causing the coagulating. Without it the mixture barely changes after being blended.

Thanks for the other information never the less, it’s interesting to read.


#7

I would recommend cutting the psyllium husk and the omega oil and adding ground flax seed.


#8

Does ground flax seed lead to caking like the husk power? It looks to have quite a lot of fiber.

It does look to be a better option for Omega 3 than the oil however I’m left with only 20% of the rec. fiber amount at 10g of flax, any more and I’m overdosing on omega 3.

Have you found the lack of fiber to be an issue?

I found some in the UK here: http://www.hollandandbarrett.com/pages/product_detail.asp?pid=1893


#9

For fiber, i use about 20g of ground flax and about 20g of coconut flour. I get a lot of omega 3 but I get more omega 6 as well. (from peanut butter, yum)

The flax doesn’t coagulate like psyllium but it does tend to settle.