Impact of soy and Soylent 2.0 on men


#1

Male here. For the past 3 weeks, I have experienced a severe drop in my libido; it’s reached a 1/10 - 0/10. In the past, I have had episodes of low libido, but it has never lasted longer than maybe 5 days. It’s been about 3 weeks now. This coincides with around when I started on 2.0.

Soylent 2.0 lists soy as one of its main ingredients. I’m no nutritionist, and I don’t know if the element of soy they use–the “soy protein”–reacts with hormones the way eating soy famously does. But there’s no shortage of information linking the negative effects of soy on men.

So my question is, does Soylent 2.0 have ingredients that have the same effect on men as eating soy products? And if so, then why the heck are they using soy?


Holiday Gift Giving of Soylent 2.0 Didn't Go As Expected - Blame "SOY"
#2

Rosa Labs is committed to championing the cause of environmental sustainability. Step 1 is veganism. Step 2 is population control! :smiley:

Okay, just kidding.


#3

Cannot confirm. I’d talk to your doctor.


#4

The soy in soylent is soy isolate, not the full soy bean.
1.5 was reported to have the same, or slightly improved libido. (presumably due to having more energy).

There hasn’t been many reports on 2.0 yet.


#5

Was your pre-Soylent diet high in fats? There is evidence to suggest that high fat diets increase testosterone levels, which would in turn certainly affect libido.

If that’s the case, perhaps you just have lower testosterone levels than before due to switching to a lower fat Soylent diet.


#6

I’m not male, but I noticed no change from usual regarding libido when I switched mostly to 2.0 for about 2 weeks. Note that testosterone is the primary physiological controlling factor over libido in both men and women alike. If 2.0 had a libido-limiting effect I would be buying a lot more of it, though! When my testosterone peaks I have to take testosterone-stifling herbs to help myself sleep or else my libido keeps me awake all night :frowning: 2.0 certainly made no difference in that regard.

I think there’s probably other factors at play in your case. What was your diet like before 2.0, and has anything else in your life changed?


#7

It’s easy to test - just eliminate soy for a while, and then try switching back to Soylent.

Except for soylent, nothing has increased my “life efficiency” more than losing interest in sex.


#8

Still the isoflavone level is quite high.


#9

Do you feel your baseline energy level is lower than before soylent?


#10

Cholesterol is a precursor to testosterone. It’s possible that a lower cholesterol intake (according to the nutritional info, Soylent has zero exogenous cholesterol) might be resulting in lower T levels.


#11

Yes 2.0 has ingredients that have the same effect on men as eating soy (isoflavones), and no that effect is not worrying. Isoflavones don’t lower T levels, don’t cause man boobs or significant estrogenic effects, and plant estrogen are not the same as human estrogen and don’t have the same impact. From a source you might find more trustworthy: http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/ivan3.htm

Your experience is most likely misattribution or nocebo effect. There’s nothing in Soylent that I know of which impacts libido either way, it doesn’t have drugs just dietary nutrients.


#12

This is interesting, which cholesterol, HDL, or LDL?

@iceboat, do keep us posted and also as lazyvegan said, stop 2.0 for a while and see, and start it again, and also tell us about what your pre 2.0 diet wass. This could be useful info for RL too.


#13

The question is also, how do you accurately measure libido, when so many things can factor into whether you want to “do it” or not, with stress being the biggest influence.


#16

Thank you all so much for your replies, I really appreciate them! :blush:

@soylient:

Was your pre-Soylent diet high in fats?

I used to just eat very normally, with no regard to reducing fats or anything. I’d eat fast food, cook with medium ground beef at home, and eat lots of nuts throughout the day. So I’d say there was a decent amount of fat. Since learning about this fat fact a couple days ago, I’ve started to eat eggs and nuts again though.

@hasen:

Do you feel your baseline energy level is lower than before soylent?

Yes, my overall energy levels are lower. That could be just because my lifestyle has been a bit more lethargic. I’m not sure I can tell for certain either way.

@difisi:

Cholesterol is a precursor to testosterone. It’s possible that a lower cholesterol intake (according to the nutritional info, Soylent has zero exogenous cholesterol) might be resulting in lower T levels.

Since I found out about this a couple days ago, I started eating eggs again, in the hopes that it helps.

@Sententia:

Yes 2.0 has ingredients that have the same effect on men as eating soy (isoflavones), and no that effect is not worrying. Isoflavones don’t lower T levels…

Literature online doesn’t seem to be as decisive as you are. I have seen that bodybuilding.com article, but I’ve also seen a fair number of other articles that say the opposite.

@Tark:

This is interesting, which cholesterol, HDL, or LDL? @iceboat, do keep us posted and also as lazyvegan said, stop 2.0 for a while and see, and start it again, and also tell us about what your pre 2.0 diet wass. This could be useful info for RL too.

I think I will try this, although it will be annoying to have to change things so much and have two boxes of 2.0 sitting around that I can’t use…

@masonjam:

The question is also, how do you accurately measure libido, when so many things can factor into whether you want to “do it” or not, with stress being the biggest influence.

I’d like to say that I’m old enough to a have a pretty good grasp of my body, my personal moods and cycles. I’m very “aware” of my body and hormones. I have an active sex life and this past period has been very low-stress.

@obviouslyanonymous:

So glad I saw your post. Can confirm similar issue here.

I am also on an SSRI, Cipralex aka Lexapro aka Escitalopram. What medication were you on and what did you switch to? I am also using an alternate account for this reason :wink: I asked permission from a mod and they said it’s ok.


#17

You know, there are other ways to handle that… or are you in a contest?


#19

Those “other ways” still involve staying up later than I’d like. Having a herbal tea or popping a couple pills doesn’t interrupt my life.


#20

The reason I asked about energy levels is I’m guessing it could be the glucose.

The glucose in Soylent is (supposedly) slow to be released into the blood stream. Usually with regular food, blood sugar levels spike after eating and then come down a couple hours later.

I would suggest trying to supplement with some fruits (ironic how fruits are now a supplement :stuck_out_tongue:) or coffee.


#21

I’ve linked to it in other threads, but here’s a CSPI article about the scientific evidence around soy.

TL;DR: 14 studies unanimously found that soy did not affect testosterone levels. 9 other studies unanimously found that soy did not affect estrogen levels significantly. 2 studies on male fertility found no changes resulting from soy consumption.

So, probably coincidence. Could be seasonal changes in mood. Could be all kinds of things. Almost certainly not the soy in Soylent 2.0.


#22

@mathew Thank you for your response. Yes, I’ve seen the meta-analysis that the article is referring to. But I’ve also seen a lot of information based on other studies that aren’t so sure. At very best, the data regarding the effects of soy on men is inconclusive. Most studies state that “moderate” use of soy has been found to be safe, while large amounts are not.

Eating Soylent 2.0 is a surefire way of eating probably the highest amount of soy possible. I can’t think of another way someone could eat a higher amount of soy, when 100% of their protein is coming from that source. Therefore, Soylent 2.0 takes us way, way past the safety zone of “moderate” soy use. I don’t believe that any of those aforementioned studies tested for this level of consumption.


#23

It seems to be rather pretentious to quote yourself. However, as I stated in another thread, “Patients with soy allergies confirmed by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges are very rare. Animal data confirms low immunological reactivity for soy. You may want to continue searching for another stressor other than soy.”

Next: Nutrisludge refers to himself in the third person.