Increase calories without poisoning yourself? Goal: 4,000 calories


#1

Hello! I have trouble eating more than 2,000 calories a day naturally (I mean via hunger) and so since I’m supposed to eat even more than that, I’ve been struggling with it for a long while now. I’d like to start replacing all meals with Soylent as an experiment, to see if it’s easier for me to get to my goal consistently.

Soylent is going to provide 2,000 calories and a safe range of the nutrients required. I don’t have much knowledge of how all the ingredients work together or why one protein is better than another; I’d just like to get what I need. I’ve tried some calculators and reached the conclusion for my active lifestyle I need at least 3,300 calories. I’d like to gain 10 lbs this year, so I’m thinking 4,000 calories would be a good daily intake for now, and I can scale back once I reach my goal.

How can I do this without hurting myself or overworking my organs by adding additional amounts of nutrients? I know you can get fillers, but what amounts of what stuff should I get and be adding each day to get to my goal? If there is already a thread with this exact information, I haven’t found it yet… please link me kindly, thanks! C:


#2

Unless you’re drastically losing weight, or tired all the time, the fact that you have trouble eating over 2000kcal may mean you don’t need to. Those calculators are not perfect. I’m sure some advice will come from this thread as far as healthily gaining weight, but I’d say most definitely consult your doctor as a first opinion.


#3

I believe you, and understand. Advice on achieving 4,000 calories in the manner described in the above post is what I’m looking for, thanks!


#4

4k is an insane amount of calories. Why do you need that in the first place?


#5

Please, do you guys have any input on how to achieve this in the manner that I requested above?

Note: I mentioned I have an active lifestyle, and I am seeking weight gain. Something I did not mention is I naturally have a quick metabolism, and am very tall. These are details I’d like to avoid getting into. I am only seeking the answer to my question: how to add 2,000 calories to the original formula without causing health issues due to there being too many of specific types of nutrients (I think fat soluble ones are bad? I dont know… :C).


#6

you can buy the same or similar maltodextrin, oil, and rice protein. Each should come with their own calorie/(g or Volume), from there you measure out the desired amount of each. Of course this means you would have to buy a proper scale and/or measuring cup.


#7

Thanks so much! I’ll look into these ingredients!


#8

You’d probably want to keep same caloric ratio, 50% carb, 30% protein, 20% fat, you can use any type of maltodextrin, dextrin, or even sugar. Protein can come from wherever as well: whey, rice, soy, etc.

Just make sure your carb and protein source don’t have significant amounts of added vitamins and minerals. Stay away from enriched blends.

Adding extra calories to Soylent really shouldn’t be all that hard and unless you’re purposefully taking a densely packed multivitamin, your sources will generally not "overwork"your organs.

HOWEVER! Adding that many calories WILL be shock to your metabolic system, and unless you’re EXTREMELY active, you will be gaining a TON of fat. And significant extra fat WILL overwork your system. Please talk to your doctor before loading up the calories.

FYI: Hugh Jackman allegedly kept his calories around 4000 per day. He was doing extreme training EVERYDAY and eating every 2 hours.

in conclusion… BE CAREFUL.


#9

Fairly simple, add more fat, preferably saturated fat or medium-chained trigycerides. Coconut oil or MCT oil are good sources.


#10

I’d suggest adding a few tablespoons of resistant starch. Resistant starch is associated with better insulin sensitivity and lower circulating blood glucose. Add as much mct oil as your stomach/palette will tolerate. Mix soylent with whole milk or coconut milk instead of water, or some mixture thereof. If you’re still short of your calorie goal add another scoop of protein powder


#11

Are you training for a marathon? That’s the only reason I can think of that you would need that many calories per day. And the “I’m thinking” tells me you haven’t talked about this with a doctor or nutritionist. No one should be eating that much on a regular basis without talking to a medical professional.

Barring any significant metabolic disorder, the vast majority of people only vary between 200-500 kcal/day from the average of 2000 kcal/day (source: http://examine.com/faq/does-metabolism-vary-between-two-people.html). So unless you have a diagnosed metabolic disorder (and I apologize if you do), I seriously question your claim of a “quick metabolism”.

If you are what is considered a “hard gainer”, you are most likely underestimating your daily caloric intake.

I’m sorry if this post sounds negative, but I’ve seen “hard gainers” develop serious health issues from consuming ridiculous amounts of carbs because they “have trouble bulking up”.


#12

You don’t need to put on the pressure like this any longer; I am competent enough to understand there are health risks associated with altering my diet significantly. I have health insurance, and will be seeking medical professionals throughout the process of making Soylent a part of my life. This post is simply a part of my research heading into this, so that I can be better prepared. The question I asked was about a goal that I have, and how to do that safely in regards to the poisoning myself by taking in an overabundance of nutrients. The composition of carbs / proteins / fats I can handle myself and adjust as I find necessary.

Please, for the sake of quality of this thread, we should be sticking to answering the original posting, though I do thank you all for your suggestions otherwise to this point.


#13

Honestly, you deserve the pressure. You are making several questionable claims. Allowing questionable claims to go without scrutiny is irresponsible, regardless of how innocuous they may seem.

The purpose of this forum is to discuss things. You posted something that struck me, as a medical professional, as unsafe. I added my informed two cents about the safety of your plans. I hardly see that as degrading the quality of the discussion.

As to the question of what you should eat to add calories without developing a toxic level of some other nutrient, it depends highly on why you need the extra calories. You should ask a nutritionist, not the anonymous denizens of the internet :stuck_out_tongue:


#14

You’re right, I should not have given any specifics in my original post; that would have kept things more simple. I’ll be doing just as you’re suggesting - seeking advice from a nutritionist.

Thanks again!


#15

what were your reasons again for wanted to consume 4000 calories?.. what is your weight right now?

Define your active lifestyle? do you bike or run all day?


#16

Hey, I understand your issues, as I’ve had trouble maintaining my weight while doing intensive weight lifting and kung fu training before and have put myself on a 3,500-4,000 kCal diet.

Try to track your weight about twice a week to see where you are at. If you check it more often, you go nuts. Try to aim for no more than .5kg/week. If you’re gaining weight faster than that, stop. If you’re working on gaining muscle mass, not fat, a set of calipers will help you to make sure your bodyfat % isn’t changing dramatically.

You’re going to have to ramp up to it. If you suddenly go from 2,000 to 4,000 calories, your body won’t absorb them (to put it crudely: you’ll poop it all out). Go slowly. And to do this, you really will need to log your food like crazy. I know it sounds bad, but you get used to it pretty quickly. I really recommend MyFitnessPal for this. If you’re accurately logging everything you eat, it will be able to tell you if you’re getting a dangerous amount of a micronutrient, but it’s on you to know what your UL are and stay under them.

I’d also probably take a recipe like Hacker School (what I use) and use that for your soylent. It will give you more flexibility. For example, if you eat a lot of potatoes, you’ll probably want to cut back on potassium, so you can mix less (or none) into your shake.


#17

Thanks for this input! That is exactly what I’ve been trying to do ramp up calories while ramping up physical activity (end goal is 2-4 hours a day). I am considering taking the Soylent nutritional information along with some of the products / ideas listed here to a nutritionist near the end of March or whenever we finally get this stuff.


#18

There have been a couple of times in my life that I’ve needed to be on high calorie diets like this, (due to swim team, amongst other strenuous activities). While I would not recommend it for the long haul, a very pure whey protein and a maltodextrin powder are ways to gain caloric value without too many added nutrients (but check the list on the protein to make sure for yourself). For an even more short-term solution (especially before Soylent actually releases… stupid delays), I like Optimum Nutrition’s Serious Mass, I’ve found it cheapest on Amazon, if you have Prime and are in the US. As far as the earlier suggestion of soy protein, avoid it like the plague, that will destroy your body. I could go dig some articles out of the depths of my email, but really, a google search of “dangers of soy” should suffice.


#19

As someone with a high metabolism, it’s pretty funny seeing everyone freaking out about 4k calories.

When I’m lifting and running seriously 3000-3500 is normal for me and I’m 5’6’’ and 140lbs.


#20

Welcome to the internet. It’s full of human beings.

(And spam bots)