Low iron vegan protein


#1

I am looking for a low iron vegan protein. Most if not all the plant based proteins I’ve looked at come with a hefty dose of iron.


#2

Am curious - is the iron inherent in the protein source, or is it supplemented into the protein mixes you’re seeing?


#3

The iron seems to be inherent in the protein. It’s not bad if I’m only using 1 or 2 servings in a recipe. If I want to do low carb or high protein it becomes a problem.


#4

I carry the gene for hemochomatosis, so I’m careful about iron - but all the proteins I use are whey-based, though, and there’s no measurable iron in them (except the chocolate-flavored version, which has a little bit of iron that comes in with the cocoa powder.) My biggest source of iron is actually the oat flour, itself.


#5

I agree that whey protein has very little iron in it but its not vegan ( being made from milk and all). What I’m looking for is a vegan protein that won’t break the iron bank.


#6

I was thinking about switching to the vegan protein optimizer formula and you’re right it has a significant amount of iron. Something to consider.


#7

No, no, I get that whey is not an option if you’re trying to be vegan… I was just expanding the iron issue to cover the most commonly used protein, because this topic brings up iron as well as protein.

(And, to be honest, I had never actually checked the iron levels of my proteins individually, even though I pay attention to the iron total in my DIY.)


#8

Actually, this just got me thinking about the bioavailability of iron… if you can’t limit your intake, maybe you can limit your uptake. I did a quick check on the LPI site about ways to limit iron absorption (such as taking lots of calcium), was reading on heme and non-heme iron (heme is found in animal products, non-heme in plant products), and found this:

Because iron from plants is less efficiently absorbed than that from animal sources, the U.S. Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) has estimated that the bioavailability of iron from a vegetarian diet is only 10%, while it is 18% from a mixed diet. Therefore, the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) for iron from a completely vegetarian diet should be adjusted as follows: 14 mg/day for adult men and postmenopausal women, 33 mg/day for premenopausal women, and 26 mg/day for adolescent girls (17).
http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/minerals/iron/

Have you been targeting the normal male RDA of 8mg? If you’re staying vegan, you may not need to go quite so low on the iron.


Complete Recipe Criticism
#9

That’s a really good point. Makes sense that you should have more leeway from a plant based source.


#10

My current vegan recipe has a hair under 13mg of iron. So if I want to keep it safe for people like @MentalNomad I don’t have much wiggle room.


#11

My formulas have 9 to 11 grams of iron, almost exclusively from the oat flour, and I was unhappy to have it over the 8mg RDA. Now that I know the RDA is 14mg for vegetable-sourced (non-heme) iron, I feel better about it.

I use a no-iron multivitamin (most ‘for men’ multis also have no iron), and my iron levels at my last blood test were fine (middle of the range.)

I only have one gene for hemochromatosis, not a matched pair, so I’m not going to develop a serious problem (it’s recessive), but I may be at slightly increased odds, so I’ll just continue to pay attention to it.

(Off topic, it sucks that the FDA has directed 23andme to stop selling health-related reports to consumers. I think they’re a wonderful source of information.)


#12

Agreed. Found out I was at increased odds of getting type 2 diabetes and sure enough when I had my blood sugar tested I was minimally above the norm.


#13

I found out I was at highly increased risk of blood clots in the form of deep vein thrombosis or life-threatening pulmonary embolism. Armed with this knowledge, I can:

  1. Take baby aspirin daily.
  2. Take fish oil regularly.
  3. Get up and move around every 60-90 minutes when sitting, on long drives, and on airplane flights.

These three simple, healthy things stand a good chance of preventing my untimely death, or at least avoiding a lot of pain. Possibly healthy for everyone, but for more important for me.