Mathmatic conversion help?


#1

If I have, say 5g of sea salt, and there’s 382.61g of sodium per kg - can you check my formula to figure out how much in the 5g? I’m not good at math on my best day, and it’s far from my best day.

So…1000 g in a kg
1000/5 = 200
382.61/200=1.91g sodium in 5g sea salt?

Does that seem right?


#2

That is correct.

382.51 sodium       x sodium
----------     =  -----
1000 g             5 g

5 x 382.51
---------    = x
1000

x = 1.913 g of sodium

#3

Thanks. And if I needed to do it with another nutrient that was measured in mg/kg - it would essentially be the same thing, right? Only with mg?


#4

As long as all the values of the nutrient are in mg.

As a totally random example:
5mg of kale, 382.61mg of Molybdenum per kg of kale.

5g of kale = 1.913mg of Molybdenum.


If there were 4.23g of Molybdenum per kg of kale, you’d have to convert it to mg first (4230mg /kg).


#5

Great. Thanks so much for the help.


#6

I’d write it down like:
382.6g/1000g = 0.3826 (factor)
5g * 0.3826 = 1.913g


#7

I am too lazy. I just google “45.1 mg as mcg” and the web does the work for me.

Shameful.


#8

nacl (sodium chloride) = 39.337% sodium and 60.663% chlorine

0.05 x 39.337 = 1.96685

so yeh close enough, maybe the sea salt has .05685 g of something else mixed into the lattice.


#9

I’m using Himalayan sea salt. It has a lot of other stuff in it. I found a spectral analysis if anyone’s interested.


#10

Most of the time, I do that. Actually, if you type just mg to g into google, google pops up it’s own little converter and you just have to type in the numbers. It works for just about every conversion. ^ That just required a little more math after the conversion.