My Estimated Calories per day needs are way high


#1

So According to This tool a 6’8" man at 250 lbs needs 3233 kcal for a sedentary lifestyle.

My roommate and I started with the Food Stamp Friendly Soylent recipe, and even mixing every batch I make with milk, I still can’t get to 3000 calories a day and finish all my soylent. Around 4-5 pm I get really lethargic, and am too stuffed to think about moving. I crash hard and sleep til about 4 the next morning and wake up ravenous.

I’m pre-diabetic so i don’t just want to consume soda pop or other sugar to push myself through to that many calories. But 2000 calories is a 2000 calorie shortfall for me at my present weight(400lbs), and while losing a pound of fat a day seems like it’s nice, that seems like an unhealthy rate to be losing weight


#2

The absolute best and cheapest way to increase calories is to add fats (Usually from oils).


#3

Olive oil shooters for me huh? Ohh that sounds wonderful :stuck_out_tongue: but also not at all like a bad idea.


#4

Haha, yeah it’s not the tastiest, you’ll have to find ways to disguise the flavor.
Since my recipe is ketogenic it uses almost 230g of fat to meet my calories.
Lucky for me I only need 2500 kcal a day.


#5

As a pre-diabetic it would be much better for you to keep carbs low-ish and make up that difference through fat. Virgin olive oils can really dominate the flavour, but a processed (lighter colour) olive oil or something like canola/rapeseed oil is very mild and shouldn’t really be noticeable. Anyway, so long as you get enough water, protein and micronutrients, that sort of weight loss shouldn’t be too bad.

Anyway, I’m not sure that being physically unable to maintain your current weight is actually a bad thing.


#6

I’m trying to drop 200lbs (from 450 to 250), so I’m definately aware that I need to lose a lot of weight. I’m trying to get enough lost that I can reasonably walk a lot again. I’ve started getting stress fractures from walking(which is what prompted me to give a damn about my weight again).

What I’m struggling with is losing it at a rate that won’t cause other problems. A 2k calorie per day shortfall is a huge shortfall, losing a pound a day seems unhealthy when 1-2 lbs a week is what is usually recommended. (Even assuming that they’re imagining a 200lbs person trying to get to like 180, and I say that 2-4 is okay for me I still don’t want more than 1500 deficit a day).

I’m trying to get my carbs between 75 and 125ish. I basically decided that going part way and figuring out how well I’ll actually follow through on making shakes and eating only those for the most part before I spend the money to shift the comp of my soylent towards my goal. I’ll have to try canola oil, definitely less expensive than olive oil would be, and a good way to up the fats.


#7

That’s definitely a good range to keep your carbs in.

I had to drop my caloric intake over the last two weeks about 500-1000 kcal a day (down to 2500). So far I’ve lost 18 pounds, my goal being 22. That’s a little over a pound a day.

You definitely have to keep it up though, and drink lots of water. You can get dehydrated without even realizing it, until you get a drink of water.

I think the biggest concern is just nutrition. I would do some research and be sure, but I don’t think it matters how significant the weight loss is as long as you’re not starving yourself and getting good nutrition.

Those recommendations are probably just to stop people from trying to starve themselves to lose weight.

Good luck! Let us know how it goes.


#8

Ignore the online calculators, seriously. I work in IT (at home, too), which translates to me sedentary as fuck. The online calculators say I need to eat around 2200-2500 calories (I’m 6’4). To lose weight, I really need to consume about 1800 calories (my activity level is painfully minimal)

What I would do is just drink your soylent when you’re hungry. Ignore the quantity, just drink it. Record your weight the morning of Day 1, and then again the morning of Day 8. If you’ve gained weight (or stayed around the same weight), then decrease calories.

Your body’s builtin hunger detection system works amazingly well. Don’t drink soylent just because you think you’re supposed to. Listen to your body and drink when you’re hungry. As for you not wanting to drop down to 2000 calories, there’s absolutely nothing wrong with you eating 2000 calories. It’ll be really good for your body, especially with drinking soylent and getting all of your nutrients.


#9

I think the cut off for calorie deficit as far as losing weight is 1000, meaning you could eat 2233 and you’d be fine, but thats some second hand info I picked up from a body building website so…


#10

I don’t want to sound alarmist but if your are pre-diabetic and trying to lose 200 lbs, I think you should be dealing with professionals and not random internet forum people.

To me this sounds like a fairly serious health issue and you should be dealing with a doctor, dietitian, and personal trainer. I would say even trying to do a Soylent diet is borderline dangerous given your health status.

Again, I hope this doesn’t come across the wrong way, I just am truly concerned and wish you the best.


#11

@schulte257 I’m at 450lbs so my actual sedentary burn is still HUGE!

@cameron_mulder Thank you for your concern. :slight_smile: I know it’s hard to convey a message like that in a way that will be read kindly online

I am working with my doctor on this. I’m a poor broke student though and the idea of finding money for a dietitian, or personal trainer is laughable, but I get to see a doctor free through the campus clinic.

One of my biggest issues is that I’m VERY tall 6’8". I’m still hugely overweight, but proportionally the numbers aren’t as bad as they first look. My Dr. is happy with my other stats(BP, Sugars, etc), and until I broke my foot I was making pretty good(if slow) progress walking a mile or two a day.

My biggest goal for soylent is honestly to buy time back to do things I love and simplify food. I’m aiming for %60-80 of my food every day to be soyent, and have an appointment with my doc every few weeks to check on things.


#12

The Caloric intake calculators are not very accurate for obese (BMI > 30) people. You need enough calories to run the Ideal weight you + about 1/4 the calculated calories to run the overweight part of you (if that makes any sense).

So plug (my ideal weight) + (amount I’m over weight)/4 into the weight field of the calculator to get a better idea of you daily caloric needs.

If you take a BMI of 24.9 to be the upper range of good body weight then:
24.9 = (weight in Kg)/(Height in Meters)^2
Ideal weight in Kg = 24.9 x(80" x 0.0254)^2 = 102.8 Kg = 226 lb

so use 226 + 224/4 = 282 lbs in the calculator to see what your caloric needs are.


#13

Thanks for the observation.


#14

As someone who is 6’8" and 260 lbs. let me just say that that calorie estimate looks about right to me. I think I eat just a bit more than that.