New Idea For "Solid" Soylent


#1

After some cursory thought and googling, I’ve found that homemade protein bars more or less just some kind of protein flour and a binder, most often milk.

I’m thinking of taking a bag of Soylent, adding the oil, and just enough water to make a kind of dough, forming 3 or 4 “bars”, then wrapping that in tapioca or rice paper. The rice paper makes a convenient edible wrapper, is more or less flavorless, and adds very little calorie wise.

Thoughts?


#2

Sounds interesting! Please let us know how it turns out.


#3

Reports are that dough-consistency Soylent is very, very sticky.


#4

What if it was then frozen?

Wouldn’t be sticky any more…


#5

Well, it wouldn’t be sticky until it defrosted…


#6

Interesting.

You might try folding your edible wrappers into bar form and pouring the dense soylent directly into them, with the intent of eating the wrapper - this might get around the “sticky” problem, but you might have a lot of “oozing” while eating.

You might also play with heating - I sometimes nuke my DIY soylent if I feel like a warm meal, and I’ve been playing with nuke times. If it gets warmer than lukewarm, the proteins start to cook and turn solid. I’ve turned a glass of DIY soylent into DIY spoonbread; it was delicious. You might experiment with similar “mild cooking” to firm up your Soylent bars - my DIY is made with whey and has more oat flour than official Soylent, so it may behave differently.


#7

I feel like a Soylent bar, sort of like a clif bar, would be a wonderful addition to the Soylent idea. I imagine when Soylent (or Soylent-like products) reach supermarkets and grocery stores we will see something like this on the shelves in addition to current Soylent.


#8

I mean, I’ve been on Soylent 1.0, varying between 40 and 80 percent, and I still find the idea of a bar more palatable than liquid Soylent, though that is by no means a complaint. The liquid stuff is great, it’s just not “food” the way we’ve all been raised on. It’s filling and delicious, but you can’t chew it.


#9

If you want solid Soylent check out MealSquares, they’re in open beta right now.


#10

Ok, progress has been made. I picked up the rice paper wrappers at Kroger today, came home and whipped up a batch of bars.

Soylent is indeed very sticky, and it’s in powder form is apparently insanely hydrophilic. However, carefully controlling the mixing order and water amount yields a really firm “dough” that works pretty well.

Here’s how I made them:

  • 2/3 Cup dry Soylent 1.1 powder

  • ~1.5 Tablespoon oil blend (this is approximate)

  • 2.5 Teaspoon Splenda (the complete lack of sweetness in 1.1 is great for flavoring, but piss poor for eating in bar form)

  • 2 Tablespoons warm-ish water

  • 1 Rice Paper Spring Roll Wrapper

Start with the Soylent powder and Splenda in a medium bowl. Add the oil. Using a silicone spatula, start pressing down and “smearing” the Soylent powder into the oil. Your end goal here is to incorporate as much Soylent into the oil as possible, you should end up with a bowl of what looks like wet-ish sand. Once you’ve smooshed and smeared all the oil clumps into the Soylent, add the water one tablespoon at a time, smearing and smooshing between water additions. You want to “smoosh” and smear as much as possible, sort of folding the water into the Soylent. Keep going until it looks like it won’t change consistency any more, and then keep going a bit longer. You should end up with a Soylent dough that will more or less only stick to itself, and will keep it’s shape for the most part when left alone.

At this point, hydrate your spring roll wrapper, lay it out flat, roll your Soylent dough into a thick “snake” and plop that down in the center of the wrapper. Wrap that up like a spring roll or burrito, flatten slightly and then refrigerate till dry and firm. “Recipe” yields one bar, roughly 510 calories (I’ll have to get a more accurate and relible scale before I can weigh them out and actually see).

These are actually pretty good. Just as filling as regular Soylent, but the Soylent flavor is much more intense. It’s not unpleasant by any means, it’s simply unique.

Notes & Addenda:

This whole process is designed loosely around DIY protein bars, and a method for baking crackers. Therefore, it may be simplified with a food processor. I don’t own one, so I wouldn’t know.

I’m working on an idea to add flavor “gel” to the inside of the wrapper, using flavorant and agar agar to make a sort of gel. I haven’t gotten the agar, nor do I quite know what would work well as flavors yet. I know that vanilla chai tea makes an excellent complement to Soylent, so that may be my first attempt.

If anyone has an suggestions or flavors, or would like to donate some agar agar let me know, it’d be a huge help.


#11

Very interesting. I like the liquid diet, but I can see how this would be appealing.


#12

white chocolate macadamia nut. As someone who’s eaten a variety of protein/nutrition bars, I find that this flavor tends to mask/compliment all other stuff really well. Haven’t gotten to try my Soylent yet though so idk how it would combine with that particular flavor.


#13

Very cool!

Don’t forgot to drink a lot of water when eating it - like you said, it’s insanely hydrophilic.