NYC Food Bank Soylent Drop Off Locations


#1

Anyone know of any food banks etc… in NYC that accept older Soylent versions (1.3 and under) I want to donate?

If not foodbanks then anyone in NYC area PM me if you want them


#2

I love Soylent.

But I doubt any food bank will accept a donation of Soylent. When that day does comes, I’m not sure they would accept older versions.

(@vanclute may be interested.)


#3

Why wouldn’t they accept it? They want non-parashable packaged foods. Sure sounds like a description of Soylent. Although 1.3 and before had the separate bottles which could make donation tough.


#4

I agree that they should accept it.

I am speculating that they won’t for a myriad of reasons. Food banks won’t recognize it’s usefulness, food banks and families will think it is a supplement, families won’t want “powdered food” donated to them, etc. Basically, you’d need the person taking the donation to recognize Soylent, and the family designee to recognize Soylent.

As @EveB said in February, “But that would require an educated food bank clientele.”

Heck, hopefully I’m wrong. OP can easily find multiple food banks in NYC and donate, then report back.


#5

I’ve been using my leftover 1.3 to bake into bars. I make 2 bags at once and keep them in the freezer. Sometimes on the road I can’t take my liquid Soylent with me and the bars work much better. I think a food bank would see Soylent as a supplement even though it’s clearly not one.


#6

@ashmatache, If you want to get rid of 1.3, why dont you send it to @vanclute instead. He is buying it up. Heating and consuming soylent might not be healthy. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_glycation_end-product


#7

It is more accurate to say that cooking food may not be healthy.


#8

Lets just say i did not want to say that.


#9

I live in Hoboken and work(ed) in Manhattan and I’ve always debated on offering Soylent to the many homeless people I would see every day, but then I fear that they would simply throw it away because it tastes gross and they have no way to really store it effectively.