Oatmeal Cookie Recipe


#1

Hello everyone,

I managed to make some cookies that worked out pretty well. The recipe below makes 2600 calories worth of cookies, designed for 12-14 cookies. Each cookie will be about 200 calories and provide 12% of your micros; That will leave you fully gassed up at ~1800 calories. (35% Carbs, 50% Fat, 15% Protein)

Except that, for my specific supplement mix, folate and niacin are below the DRI. That’s because of the reduction in nutritional content due to cooking. Especially for folate, it’s not worth putting 3x the folate into the cookie just so 2/3 of it can be destroyed by baking.

I’m still tweaking it and working on cleaning up my spreadsheets, but the point of this isn’t my specific list of supplements (I live in Japan anyway, so most of you won’t have access to the same things for the same price). Many of you have your own stash of vitamins, so you’ll need to swap out my vitamin list for your own to make it work. The point is that it works.

I won’t have time to share the final results until next year sometime, so I figured I’d share what I have so far since I haven’t seen any cookie recipes yet.

  • 120g Oats

  • Wet Ingredients

  • 115g Coconut oil (substitutable with Butter)

  • 100g Xylitol (substitutable with sugar)

  • 2 eggs (~110g)

  • 3ml Vanilla

  • Dry Ingredients

  • 50g Rye Flour

  • 60g Soy Protein

  • 20g Ground Psyllium Husk

  • 20g Ground Flax Seed

  • 4g Baking Powder (or 2g Baking soda)

  • 2.5g salt

  • 8g Cinnamon

  • Vitamin/Supplement Mix

  • 1 Multi vitamin (Now Foods ADAM)

  • 1800mg of Calcium supplements

  • 500mg vitamin C supplements

  • 24mg of Iron

  • 1200mg of Magnesium

  • 1000mg of Choline

  • 500μg of vitamin K

  • 200μg of vitamin K-2

  • 1000mg of sulfur (from MSM)

  • 150μg Iodine

  • 8.5g Potassium (from 55g of Potassium Gluconate)

  • 700μg of copper

Instructions:

  1. Mix the wet ingredients separately, until it’s smooth. Set aside. (You may need to keep the bowl warm to prevent the coconut oil from freezing)
  2. Crush up all the supplements into a powder, then in a separate container, mix the dry ingredients in, starting with the low mass and working up to high mass items to keep it homogenous.
  3. Mix the wet and dry ingredients together until it’s smooth and battery. Then add the oats. Set aside for 1 hour.
  4. Spoon 12-14 blobs onto a greased pan. Cook at 190 degrees for 10 minutes.

#2

Also, it works out to about $10/day. But the point isn’t to be sustained on the cookies alone. The point is guilt-free cookies for anyone dieting. They’re healthy enough that you could binge, and as long as you stay below your calorie limit, all you’d need is a folate supplement… and water.


#3

Nice. Want to try these myself now, but I’m too lazy to cook. :stuck_out_tongue:


#4

Interesting recipe. Are all the supplement ingredients meant to be taken separately?


#5

They’re meant to be crushed, powdered, and mixed in. :slight_smile:


#6

Yes, I wasn’t sure if a cookie would bake properly or have an acceptable texture with all the supplements added. This was my preliminary experiment to confirm that it works.

Caveat: This is a “rough draft” if you will. If you plan to just eat cookies all day, folate and niacin DO need to be taken separately.


These are great for giving to friends and family who don’t understand or appreciate what soylent is. It tastes great and it’s simple. Just offer them a cookie and once they’re finished you can mention that they just had 12% of all the required micronutrients, and it was only 200 calories.

From there the logic is pretty simple. If they can appreciate that, then soylent is just the same thing in drink form.


#7

@Sintax Are you using whole psyllium husk or a powdered one?

Also, I have… trouble… digesting flax seed (and most other unprocessed plant matter). Any idea if those could be crushed (e.g. in a pill crusher)? I have a pill crusher but no flax seed on hand to try it.


#8

Oh, sorry - I use ground flax seed meal and psyllium husk powder. I will edit the main post.

These cookies are already kind of tough. I think using whole seeds… or whole husks? (gag) would make them like gravel.


#9

If the cookies are tough or dry, cook for less time at a slightly higher heat. 200 degrees at 8 minutes may work better.

Replace the eggs with a vegetable based egg substitute, remove some of the oats and coconut oil to be replaced with chocolate chips, and eat it raw. Super cookie dough!


#10

Thanks for the advice. I’ll try that and keep tweaking the recipe and post a final version in January.


#11

So I made an awesome discovery recently. Apparently flax seed meal can be used as an egg replacer. So by first mixing the flax with water (1:3 ratio by volume) and letting it sit in the fridge for an hour, you get a slimy goupy flax sludge which can be used in place of the eggs.

Without the eggs, it can be cooked for only 5 minutes. The cookies are very soft now and taste much better. With peanut butter they taste amazing, so I’m going to try replacing the coconut oil with PB next.


#12

I’ve seen that you can replace eggs with flax, but I was unaware of a specific method. My recipe uses 60g/day of ground flaxseed, so what you’re saying may explain some of the stickiness of my soylent prior to baking.


#13

Just mixing the flax into the powder doesn’t really do anything. Try mixing the flax with water and letting it sit first.

Source:
http://bonzaiaphrodite.com/2011/10/how-to-make-a-flax-egg-for-vegan-baking-the-right-way/


#14

Hippies such as myself make hair gel by boiling 1 Tbsp of whole flaxseeds in 1 cup of water for 10 minutes, then straining the seeds out. After it sits (and cools) a bit, you’ll have slimey goop (much like egg whites) that you can use as hair gel. It’s totally edible, but I admit that having convinced myself that flax seeds are for hair gel, it gives me just a second’s pause to think of drinking it :grinning:


#15

I hope you will add the recipe to the DIY site


#16

What I like most about these ideas is that cookies can be stored for hours, maybe days, and still be ready to eat. It would be so nice to eat a few cookies for a nutritious dinner and get on with more important things to do. It’s ready-to-eat when I’m hungry. If Rosa Labs starts making and selling such a product, I hope they can choose a better name than Soylent.


#17

When I made Soylent cookies they were absolutely amazing and great to have around. Unfortunately they were SUCH a pain to make (the batter being so outrageously stick, makes a major mess) that I haven’t wanted to do it again. Been sticking to brownies which make almost no mess at all.

But I do miss those cookies and would sure love to have them around regularly…