Oive Oil Quality Research


#1

Has anyone done any research on what brands of olive oil are actually olive oil, and are somewhat affordable?


#2

Well, olive oil is olive oil… What is your problem ?


#3


http://www.newyorker.com/online/blogs/books/2012/02/the-exchange-tom-mueller.html
http://www.scambusters.org/oliveoilscam.html
http://www.npr.org/2011/12/12/143154180/losing-virginity-olive-oils-scandalous-industry

Just the first few links that came up under “olive oil fraud” There have been 3 studies, I think, done on it. I’m sure one of the articles references them.


#4

Well, at some point, you’ll have to trust someone. Just go and buy olive oil in your supermarket, or buy it from a local craftsman… Or do the analysis yourself, from A to Z, because anyone here could just lie.


#5

Wouldn’t buying extra-virgin olive oil be the best quality?


#6

I believe they are all olive oil, it’s just that some are better quality than others (i.e. some are virgin, extra virgin, and/or cold pressed and others are not though they may claim to be; some may be too old). Commenter Laura Gray in the NPR article comments provides some tips: good oil should have the harvest date on the bottle, the bottle should be dark to protect the oil from light. She says olive oil is best consumed within a 12 months of the harvest date. As for whether the oil is physically extracted or not, in the EU there is regulation regarding marketing oil as cold pressed, but no such regulation exists in the US, and I don’t think there is anything stopping producers from using different labels in the US.

As for being affordable, the answer is no. While you can probably find bad oil for a high price, I doubt you can find legit extra virgin cold pressed olive oil at a cheap price (I’ve never tried though – I use coconut oil).


#7

Just a head’s up, they mentioned in a recent update that the official oil included with Soylent will be canola oil.


#8

Well, I should have looked more closely yesterday, but I only had a minute.

This is the article I was looking for anyways. It’s not just that it’s inferior olive oil that is being sold. It’s the fact that some of the oils tested WEREN’T OLIVE OIL, or were heavily adulterated with other oils.
“some were outright counterfeits, made from soy, hazelnut, and even fish oils mixed with low grade olive-pomace oil”

For health (hormonal) reasons, it’s very important that I am not consuming soybean oil. There were some (the ones that are named in the article) that were fine. I was just wondering if anyone else had done the research to save me some time. I’ll just go price shop the oils here on this list.

@zenman - I know. I’m not a fan of canola oil either. I’ve looked around and I haven’t necessarily found hard evidence showing that canoloa is BAD for you, just reading about the processing it goes through doesn’t make it an appealing substance that I want to put a lot of into my body.

Honestly, my preference is coconut oil. And that’s what I started out using last week. It was super hard on my system though and I had to drastically reduce it. I plan on slowly increasing it to try to get my system used to it.

Between that and the buckwheat that I tried, my first experiment with soylent was a failure. I’m reformulating it not, hence the new oils. :stuck_out_tongue:


#9

That link doesn’t seem to work.


#10

Crap. I closed the window because I thought I could come back to it here. I’ll find it tomorrow. It had an actual list of brands that were tested.


#11

If you have Trader Joe’s in your area, their EVOO is quite good, very reasonably priced, and has been tested and confirmed to actually be olives a couple different times.


#12

If you want ultra quality olive oil check this out

http://www.stonehouseoliveoil.com/

Very good olive oil.