Past liquid diet didn't work. Will Soylent be different?


#1

For years, I’ve had severe TMJ. Every time I chew, my jawbone makes a maddening pop behind my left eardrum. I once bought a Vita-Mix with the intention of going on an all-liquid diet, but ended up using the blender mostly to supplement meals rather than replace them because I found that liquid meals didn’t leave me feeling energized and satisified the way solid meals did. I really, really wanted an all-liquid diet to work, and had an extremely pressing reason to give it my all, but liquid meals just didn’t seem to be fueling me properly. I no longer have the blender, and now eat solid meals exclusively despite my hateful jaw. I discovered Soylent yesterday, when someone posted a link to a story about it on Facebook, and of course I devoured everything I could read about it.

Of course I’m going to buy some, or at least try one of the DIY projects, but I have to wonder: why should I expect this to be different than what I’ve done before? I have the uneasy feeling that powderizing food always makes it become absorbed by the system (at least my system) so quickly that there’s no lasting energy–like throwing sawdust on a fire. Have any of you tried other types of healthy liquid meals and bad results with those, then switched to Soylent or some similar product and had good results?


#2

I can’t speak to your experience in specific of course, but I suspect Soylent will be different as it’s not really a “liquid diet” in the way that other such diets are. Soylent has plenty of carbs and fiber so your body really treats it as if it were solid… except that your stomach doesn’t get as stretched and it seems to be easier on the digestion (at least for us and many others).

My advice is the same as for everyone… start slowly with it and replace one meal only with maybe 12 to 16 ounces of Soylent (depending on your body needs) for 3 or 4 days. Then move to two whenever you feel like it, and even gradually to 100% Soylent if you want.

That being said, we went from zero to about 75% Soylent immediately and had no real difficulty at all other than the gas issues everyone experienced to varying degrees (which subsided over time).

Hope it works out for you!


#3

To my understanding, this usually occurs if there’s not enough fiber in the diet. Fiber (especially soluble fiber) slows down the absorption process so that you get a more even distribution of nutrition which results in longer lasting energy.


#4

I’ve been doing DIY 8 months and loved it. I feel like I’ve got more “food” from DIY than I did from my horrible diet. I’ve just started switching to Soylent. It is a lot more condescend than the DIY, but seem to give me enough energy. Try some samples from the DIY marketplace. Try Soylent. See what you like.


#5

Soylent has complex carbs, fiber, protein, and fat which will help keep you feeling full.

As others have recommended it’s best not to quit regular food cold turkey. Soylent has a good amount of fiber and if your body isn’t used to it it can cause temporary digestive upset. It also has a the RDA of potassium which can also take some getting used to.

Finally everyone needs different amounts of calories everyday. I recommend visiting the below link and figure out about how many you need per day. Soylent is 1 calorie per milliliter.

http://diy.soylent.me/nutrient-profiles/calculator


#6

I wonder if it makes a difference if the fiber itself is broken into smaller pieces than it would normally be.


#7

What do you mean broken into smaller pieces?


#8

Powderized instead of in small chunks of chewed fruit/veg, I’d imagine.


#9

May be wondering if the enzymes in 1.1 are breaking down fiber.