Powdered crickets


#1

Flour made of powdered crickets contains huge amounts of fat and protein. It isn’t vegetarian, of course, but perhaps it could be used for Soylent. Insects have a small carbon footprint. People might not like eating insects, but they’re really just like shrimps.
http://www.weiku.com/products/13883065/Cricket_Insect_Flour.html


Is Soylent good for you? Is it tested? Does it contain soy?
Has anyone thought of using cricket or mealworm flour?
#2

Interesting. I was well aware of eating insects and how much protein they had, but I had no clue people were turning them into flours or powders.

I wouldn’t mind trying it, but I would have to find way more nutritional info then what is in that article.

I will attempt to do some more research later on this.

Good find.


#3

There are a lot of recent (1) publications (2) and studies into the benefits of eating insects as a method of addressing an impending global food crisis. I wouldn’t be surprised in the slightest to learn that they are a great protein and fat source. In powder form, the revulsion factor is dramatically reduced for those not familiar with the idea of consuming insects, and ultimately they are definitely bountiful. A great idea, really, and would look forward to a lot of additional research on it.


#4

Insects aren’t big enough to hack off slices like we do with cows and pigs so many people crunch on them whole, and I think that’s what repulses most people. It bears too much in common with popping a living, squirming bug in your mouth. A powdered form may indeed be just what’s needed to get people on board. Heck, I even know vegetarians that would eat insects because they believe them a lesser form of animal and not capable of suffering and emotions in the same way or at all.


#5

It’s a shame the seller only seems interested in vending industrial quantities. Someone should ask him if he has sold to anyone who’s packaging the product for the retail market. I’d certainly be up for giving it a try; I intend to attempt sampling our Manitoba grasshoppers this summer, but gotta remove the spiky lower hind legs first. Crickets are proportionately a bit fatter and don’t have those sharp spines on the hind legs, nevertheless the hoppergrasses are cheap easy and available! Which is the whole point of turning insectivore.


Insect based protein