Protein -- not so useful?


#21

I eat atleast double the calories of an average person and probably have well over twice as much muscle as the average person and Im breaking down that muscle tissue on a regular basis which requires extra protein for rebuilding.


#22

There have been many studies that we don’t need much protein. The Chittenden studies debunk the protein myth :slight_smile: Also in rural Asia , they eat 40-60 grams of protein a day (mostly plant based) and thrive on it :slight_smile: Here’s a very good study that was performed. We have known for a long time that protein isn’t that important, but marketing and media have blown it up. This “protein craze”, has been supported by the meat , egg, and dairy businesses. I hope you find this article useful <3

http://www.sportsci.org/news/history/chittenden/chittenden.htmlro


#23

I wasn’t basing my statements on studies or on rural Asia, but on my personal experience, which has convinced me that I need much more than 40g per day.


#24

I was using scientific evidence that we don’t need a lot of extra protein to benefit :slight_smile: As a species our bodies act the same, For example, we do not all need separate diets. We don’t see cows on special diets, animals thrive on specific diets. It’s strange how as a species a lot of us don’t even know what to eat anymore. We have become so far distanced from what is natural. But, back to the original statement. Extra protein doesn’t add an overall benefit. Interestingly enough, athletic performance went up with the reduction of protein! (That’s some “food for thought”) Wonderful pun :wink:


#25

OK if you want to talk studies, I’ll counter with this one that was about the first google hit: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2129168/

To quote: “For strength trained individuals to maintain a positive nitrogen balance it appears that daily protein consumption should be between 1.6 to 1.8 g·kg-1·day-1 [1-3]. The greater protein requirement is thought to be related to the enhanced protein synthesis necessary to assist in the repair and remodeling process of skeletal muscle fibers damaged during a resistance exercise session [3-6]. This has important implications for improving both muscle size and strength.”

And again, when I am not on a high protein diet, I definitely lose strength steadily (but slowly). Adding more protein to my diet fixes the problem. Based on this experience, I have trouble believing any study that says nobody needs high protein. Some day, and I’m one of them.


#26

I am a huge science guy but for some reason science seems to fail alot when it comes to bodybuilding and nutrition. Scientific findings just dont match up with personal experience for many things. Ive messed around with lowering protein cause carbs and fat are cheap compared to protein but I end up gaining fat and losing muscle. Protein really seems to curb my hunger and helps keep my calories down. Ive read fat is supposed to be more satiating but its not for me. Science also says you cant build lean bodymass and lose fat at the same time but Ive done it multiple times. Your trying to say that all humans are the same but some of us lead very different lifestyles and were not all the same size. If theres people out there getting over 200 lbs of lean body mass on 60g of protein a day I would be shocked.


#27

60 g of protein per day is hardly adequate for a bodybuilder, but in my experience, unless you’re doing steroids and you’re competing in bodybuilding or something like that, no one really needs more than 150 g of protein per day for building muscle.


#28

Yeah, I got 38 grams yesterday and seem to be doing just fine :slight_smile: Good energy and all