Rapeseed/Canola oil much healthier than olive oil


#1

Is there any reason to use Olive oil? Omega3 /Omega6 ratio is the actual thin one should concern with about fat sources. Olive oils ration is really crappy. Rapeseed oiloil production is much more efficient and hence environmentally friendly, and less wasted money. Omega 3 /omega 6 ratios: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Template:Vegetable_oils,_composition. Some more on the old olive oil misconseption:


#2

The primary reason is that canola oil tastes like liquid death. I’ve been doing a 50-50 mix of olive and canola oils with much better results.


#3

Canola oil tastes mild. Are you talking about coldpressed canola oil? And is there any scientific reason on why to do that?


#4

Olive oil has more vitamin k and e, so it’s useful in some recipes to supplement those. In conjunction with flaxseed meal, fish oil supplement, and/or coconut oil, the omega ratios are easy to adjust, and cheaper than using other sources of the vitamins in olive oil. Canola oil loses many things because of the required processing. It’s not a bad oil at all, there’s just more stuff in olive oil that makes it a broader source of nutrients.

Or use a mix of olive oil for the nutrients and canola oil for the omega ratios. There are good reasons to use olive oil over canola, but it’s not because canola is inherently bad.


#5

Of interest. http://discourse.soylent.me/t/canola-oil-as-fat-source/3149

EDIT: Aaaaaaaand I just saw your post there @anton_osika. Don’t mind me. Carry on!


#6

Using a mix sounds like a much better way. Esp. adding flax seed oil.
I cant see how olive oil could be cheaper though? Getting enough vitamin e and k should not be that difficult.

And the other reasons for canola are still viable, I hope?


#7

One concerning factor with regular Walmart canola oil is the teams fat content and potential oxidization. PUFAs are relatively unstable because they contain double bonds within their molecules. Do to environmental factors (ie heat) these bonds can be filled by a hydrogen atom. Some of these hydrogenated fats are trans fats. (Saturated fats cannot be hydrogenated. However, it is probably not best to use primarily saturated fats in Soylent for other reasons.) Hence the following citation on canola oil processed in the normal manner:

Concentrations of trans isomers of 18:2w6 and 18:3w3 were measured in soybean and canola oils purchased in the U. S. […] The degree of isomerizations of 18:2w6 and 18:3w3 ranged from 0.3% to 3.3% and 6.6% to 37.1%, respectively. The trans contents were between 0.56% and 4.2% of the total fatty acids.

SEAN. O’KEEFE, SARA. GASKINS-WRIGHT, VIRGINIA. WILEY, I-CHEN. CHEN. LEVELS OF TRANS GEOMETRICAL ISOMERS OF ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS IN SOME UNHYDROGENATED U. S. VEGETABLE OILS. J Food Lipids Vol 1 #3 pp.165-176 Sept. 1994

These trans fats are apparently a result of the high temperature processing that canola oil undergoes. (I do not oppose processing in general)

This amount of trans fat is likely not enough to be concerned about for most Soylent DIYers. However, we should remember that trans fats are highly correlated with heart disease. For example, consuming just 2% of your calories from trans fat doubles your risk of heart disease according to the following study:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9366580/

Trans fats have also been connected to other health problems such as obesity, Alzheimer’s, infertility in women, and interference with liver function. Therefore, high canola oil recipes may want to spend extra and go for cold pressed canola oil. Of course, rancidity is still an issue but cold pressed certainly seems healthier. Once again, this amount of trans fat may not really matter to most Soylenteers. However, if someone’s aim is optimal nutrition, it might be valid.

I personally plan to use a combination of olive oil, cold pressed canola oil and MCT oil.