Recipe and Practical Advice


#1

I’m looking to pull the trigger on home-made Soylent, and I was hoping to pick the minds of experienced users for some practical advice. First off, here’s the recipe I’ve come up with so far, which includes mention of rationale for my choices:
http://www.makesoylent.com/recipes/51e8b88e499c4d0200000042

With respect to recipes, I have a couple questions:

  1. I’ve seen discussion around getting Omega-3s. Is there something I should be on the look-out for in order to get that (since it doesn’t seem included in ingredients or on spreadsheets that I’ve seen)?
  2. I’ve also seen mentioned that with respect to potassium, even the RDA can have adverse affects, and that one ought to build up to that much potassium. Could someone clarify/elaborate.

Besides the recipe, I also have a few questions with respect to actually preparing Soylent:
3) How many servings do you typically mix at once? Do you do one at a time, or do you mix, say, a week’s worth and then divide evenly it into 7 (or 14, or …) servings?
4) How do people measure these precise weights? Is there a forum-favorite scale on Amazon?
5) What water-to-mix ratio do you use? (I imagine this is probably trial-and-error according to one’s particular mix.)
6) Do you mix with water just before consumption, or do you mix ahead of time (and then, do you refridgerate)?

Thanks in advance for any help you can provide. Looking forward to participating in the experiment.


#2

I can answer a couple of your questions:

Many DIY Soylent folks have found that consuming more than a couple grams of potassium produced symptoms ranging from general weakness to chest pains. Start low and build up 1 gram of potassium gluconate at a time. Stop when you get to around 3.5g to 4.5g of total potassium (not just the gluconate), or if you experience any adverse effects.

I’d strongly recommend against mixing up more than a day at once then dividing it up. Incomplete mixing could result in uneven distribution of minerals that could be harmful in large quantities. For example, you wouldn’t want to have one day’s batch to have no magnesium and tomorrow’s to have twice as much—that’s a one-way ticket to Diarrhea City at a minimum, and it could end even worse for you. It’s safer to carefully measure out one day at a time. I found the Proscale PX100 to be a pretty awesome scale for measuring small quantities like that.

Most people report mixing their day’s soylent supply with about 1.5L to 2L of water. Some people mix on the go, some people mix ahead, and some refrigerate. There is some talk on the forums about refrigeration being better for your health and for taste, but I haven’t read anything definitive.


#3

Thanks for the info about potassium; that’s exactly the information I was looking for.

Excellent advice re mixing. That’s the sort of oversight I’m hoping to avoid by asking lots of questions. :slight_smile:

Additionally: For anyone else who reads up on this thread, I found out that flaxseed meal (the main fat source of my recipe) has lots of Omega-3 fatty acids, so I don’t think that’s an issue.


#4

@Jack_OMT Wouldn’t using flaxseed as your main fat source make it difficult to ensure your essential proteins are being met as the flaxseed doesn’t have a break down of the individual proteins?


#5

@wizardofmath The flaxseed is the main fat source, but I’m using soy protein as the main protein source. As far as I’m aware that’s okay.


#6

As long as you have considered that it all looks good :smile: