So is Soylent healthy or what?

I’ve been using soylent on and off for years since 1.3. I’ve tried going 100% a few times for at least a month to a year and it was extremely difficult. My best was roughly over 3 weeks. I recently ordered some more after a year and my friend tells me that scientists say it’s not healthy for us or as we think it is. Google gives me this same confirmation it seems. I mean what the hell? The whole point of soylent other than convenience was the health aspect of it. Thoughts?

“Scientists”. Really? Who? Where’s the data? Unless he has actual data he can point to… he’s just trash talking.

Personally I see no point in going 100%. As for healthy or not… I’d wager it’s still healthier than what most people eat. But for me, I’m very very happy at around 80% and have been that way since the very very first shipments of Soylent left the building. And now with the new bars, I fine I’m turning to them for part of that remaining 20% too so on so days now I’m probably closer to 100%. But it’s no chore… if it was I wouldn’t do it.

Anyway, consider the source. If this friend has no actual knowledge regarding the “science” he/she is referring to… I would discount it entirely. If they can provide links to actual science and not the usual pseudo-scientific-fear mongering, then I’d read it with interest.

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It depends on which thing your friend is talking about.

There’s some science-based disagreement on whether the macro balance of Soylent is what’s best for us. Rosa Labs argues that excess carbs are bad, and jacking up the fats (as long as they’re healthy fats) is fine. And a lot of more recent nutrition research seems to back this up. Others (including everyone that the Canadian gov’t listens to, apparently) say that fats are always Teh Evil, and there’s still some research that seems to agree.

There’s also a belief that you can’t get your nutrition from “chemicals”, and your body will ignore anything that didn’t come straight from an uncooked vegetable. With the variant that there’s some “vitamin Z” in “real” food that scientists haven’t discovered and don’t know to include in vitamins or Soylent. But I haven’t heard of any study showing that either belief is likely. This argument tends to come from people who have a “nutrition guru” brand to sell and a fear of “chemikills”.

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Some people argue that soy mimics estrogen. Also, I read an article that argued that processed foods are bad for you because there is a lot of plastic in processed foods from the packaging and from the equipment used to make the food.

That said, I drink Soylent and hope that the company keeps an eye on the latest research so they can make any necessary changes.

For the first year and a half, the company changed the product every two months or so.

Edit: Like Vanclute said, you need to compare Soylent to what you would eat instead. All my blood tests come out good with Soylent including reduced cholesterol. I do add Vitamin D-3 and fiber, however.

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Personally I was not thrilled with the change to soy protein, just in case there’s anything to those estrogen claims. But in my searching, I couldn’t actually find any solid science to back up the claims that soy is so unhealthy. Lots of pseudo-science and outright absurd arguments, but nothing really factual. I would still love for Soylent to change to using algal protein at some point, but until then I’m too happy with the product to even consider abandoning it. My diet has never been healthier in my entire life (46 years) and I no longer have concerns about what I’ll be able to eat if I have to travel or even just be out of the house for the day etc. It’s the best.

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Exactly… no hard science to be found. :frowning:

Comparing it to what you would normally eat instead of it is the best metric for how “healthy” it is for any individual person. For me it has replaced fast food and frozen pizzas. I’m pretty sure that Soylent is much healthier than fast food and frozen pizzas, so I’m good with it. If you were to replace nice balanced meals with tons of vegetables, then it’s probably not as good of a swap.

I’ve also noticed myself watching the other foods that I eat closer now that I know that I’m replacing the most unhealthy things I eat. So generally speaking just the act of changing half my diet to Soylent has improved the non-changed half as well. So there are potential intangible benefits as well. I find myself making better choices and choosing more vegetables and things like that in my non-soylent meals. I even ordered a salad for dinner while on a business trip recently because I felt gross eating yet another hamburger on the trip. That would have NEVER happened in the past before Soylent.

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“My friend tells me that scientists say it’s not as healthy for us as we think it is.”

Our friends tend to have lots of opinions, but we should do our own research unless they’re experts in the field they’re giving us advice on.

Question: why do you want to go 100% Soylent? Generally speaking variety in your diet is beneficial for lots of reasons, and I have yet to meet anyone who’s been able to sustain 100% Soylent for more than a few months. While going full-Soylent might seem easier at first, after a while it’s going to feel like a burden.

Pay less attention to what your friends and the internet say and more attention to what your test results say. If you’re doing 100% Soylent or part Soylent and part other foods, just make sure you’re monitoring what’s happening with your body. If it looks good, great. If it starts to look out of whack, change it up.

Whatever you do, stay as far away as possible from the ridiculous estrogen conversations – that’s just dudes who are insecure about their masculinity worried that they’re going to grow breasts and that their penises will shrink. It’s a dumb conversation and you’ll find variations of it happening wherever dudes get together to talk about supplements. Again, pay attention to your test results, not the internet.

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Yep, my primary reason for getting Soylent in the first place was to have food be LESS of an issue in my life, not more. Forcing myself to consume only Soylent would indeed be a chore. So instead, I consume whatever the heck I want in any moment. But most of the time, that’s Soylent.

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I doubt that any simple diet would be good to eat 100% of the time, and eating a diet of only Soylent would be a very simple diet. Yes, you could probably survive on it indefinitely, but why would you want to do that? Soylent is great as part of a diverse diet. That is my common sense, unprofessional opinion on the subject. Btw I have been using it regularly for 2-3 years now and have experienced no bad effects.