SOLD: 45 bottles of S 2.0


#1

Well, the Soylent 2.0, as it contains gluten, definitely does not agree with me. Is there anyone in the Middle Tennessee area that would like to buy the stock that I have?


#2

I’m in VA, any chance you’re looking to ship?


#3

I’d prefer to see if there are any local parties interested first. Check with me later.


#4

As far as I know, there is no detectable level of gluten in 2.0, the only possible source is oat fiber which should have practically no gluten due to the processing.

Unless you are extremely allergic to gluten, you are either imagining or misattributing your symptoms.


#5

There is barely any gluten, but it is not certified gluten-free. From Soylent’s FAQ:

While no ingredient in Soylent 1.5 or 2.0 naturally contains
gluten, the oat flour is produced in a facility that also processes
wheat products. Although there is an allergen contamination program in
place at the facility, the final mixture of Soylent is tested to have
more than 5 parts-per-million of gluten, the concentration that the
Celiac Support Association requires in order to certify a product as
gluten-free.
The cross-contamination challenges of oats are significant. From the
farms where they are grown, to the products they are included in, oats
have numerous opportunities to come into contact with surfaces that have
also come into contact with wheat, barley or rye.
Furthermore, avenin, the storage protein found in oats, poses
additional challenges. Due to the similarities of the amino acid
sequences of avenin to those in gluten, avenin can sometimes cause
gluten-like immune responses for some people who have Celiac Disease.
The Celiac Support Association website hosts one study and links to several others on oats and Celiac Disease:
http://www.csaceliacs.org/celiac_disease_defined_oat_in_tolerance.jsp
We’re researching several promising alternatives to oat flour, but at
this time we haven’t yet identified a suitable replacement.


#6

I’m not a doctor but a celiac colleague at work said that even the tiniest trace amounts of gluten can trigger the allergic reactions.


#7

Soylent would be called gluten-free under the international standard of the Codex Alimentarius, which sets the standard at under 20 ppm. The Celiac Support Association’s standard is one-fifth that, and is the one RL is abiding by. Severe celiac disease is not at all a nice thing, so I can understand why they want to be hard-asses.


#8

Hmm, interesting.

OP mentioned in a previous thread that he had some allergic reaction to Soylent. Not sure though if it’s due to gluten or what.