Solid Soylent: Just remove most of the water


#1

I just created an account to say: I don’t know why everybody is making liquid shakes. I created some soylent using the recipe from http://www.cookingfor20.com/ and after mixing the dry ingredients with the oil, it only takes a small amount of water to create the consistency of cookie dough, and then you just eat it with a spoon! It is much more satisfying to eat something solid than to replace a meal with only a liquid!

Are other people doing this? I recommend it.


#2

They take 1 minute to shake, one minute to drink and one minute to clean (the shaker).
And with the right recipe, they ARE satisfying. :smiley:


#3

I’m still curious, though, whether you’ve tried the exact same recipe in cookie dough form. There’s been talk of cooking soylent, but I think eating it raw is an approach the community might be overlooking.


#4

Well, some people are trying to make a kind of yogurt/cereal bar out of theirs, without baking, with some success.
It can definitely work, it’s just not as efficient - especially since you would still need the water, which you then have to drink separately.


#5

I drink a lot of tea and coffee so I get plenty of liquids anyway.

I think the efficiency is about the same. I can smoosh my cookie dough into single “meals” with my hands and throw them into ziplock bags in the fridge… doesn’t get any easier than that. You can eat this stuff with your fingers if you want to, alongside a glass of water.


#6

I build my RealFoods Analogue Soylent to a custard consistency, and then freeze it in 500 ml. meal portions. I try to maintain a reserve of 8-10 meals’ worth, since preparing a batch takes about an hour (I whey-soak my phytate-containing ingredients and subsequently cook the starches and egg powder before blending the mix). That way I have the convenience of being able to grab a meal when I need it, whilst doing the donkey-work at a convenient time, usually late at night. The cooking’s a bother, perhaps, but it results in a far more palatable product (no raw-oat yuk factor) and I know I’ve done my best to deal with the phytate issue.

So when I grab a soylent from the freezer, I can either nuke it to thaw, or leave it sitting out for half an hour to soften a bit and then eat it with a spoon like ice cream, which is what I usually do. Fully thawed is also okay. So – primarily because my soylent is pretty thick, between cooked oat, buckwheat and spelt flours, cooked egg powder, peanut butter powder, psyllium husk and ground flaxseed – I’ve never even considered drinking it.

I’m now developing an alternate version, leaving out the cocoa, peanut butter powder, and blackstrap molasses, that will be cream-coloured not brown, flavoured by banana, coconut and vanilla. It, too, will be custard consistency and will contain cooked starches and egg powder.

I am quite interested in developing a solid version. I’ve always been intrigued by Logan Bread and other high-density hiking-and-climbing expeditionary rations anyway, and a solid soylent would be a logical extension of those interests.


#7

I’m waiting to turn on the internet one day and read about the first person to do the Appalachian Trail powered only by soylent. :smile:


#8

Wouldn’t it be a bit gritty given the oat flour and some of the other ingredients? In the spirit of experimenting I’m going to try this approach, but I’ll have to drop the fruit flavoring and switch to peanut butter. It could be more convenient for those times when you don’t have access to the blender.

Since dark chocolate has a lot of benefits maybe a dark chocolate chip soylent experiment is in order…


#9

There’s a slight texture to it, BE, but about the only chunks in it are from the kelp meal and I enjoy that (and just plain LOVE the Diamond V XPC yeast powder/meal, even though it’s intended for livestock). Actually most of the time it’s the ice crystals that are dominant since I rarely wait long enough for it to soften well. That’s all nit-picking, though, compared to what I’ve read here of people’s struggles to ingest their home-built soylent – too many of the products involved just seem to be problems either for texture or taste. For my money, if a person’s going to do soylent seriously over time, it had better be enjoyable. If you gotta hold your nose and chug it, you’re not gonna stick with it, unless you’re a real masochist.

I’m really getting revved up about RFA Soylent and Solid Soylent! I’m looking forward to my alternate version and hope that this weekend I’ll get some time to research SS. But my aspirations and standards are very high for Solid Soylent: I would want it to be a true realisation of Tolkien’s “Lembas,” the Elvish trail bread. I have a collection of variant recipes for Logan Bread and I’ll start there, but by the time I finish I expect there will be little or no resemblance to LB left. More than that I can’t say just now; I’m gestating the idea.

EDIT: PS I don’t blame you on the chocolate craving – I’ve been drooling over RFI’s Chocamine product ever since browsing their websiter from Julio’s link.


#10

Haha Yes! What a coincidence. I’m doing exactly this! And its ketogenic too(low carb high fat). I just posted about in another thread.

Here is some of it:

I’m making a solid soylent every day. I never liked to drink it. Right now i’m experiencing with cold-pressed rapeseed oil and desiccated coconut meat(with 60% of it being fat) , which i then ground into flour, and then mixing with the rest. So with only 15 g unsweetened cocoa and a little stevia as extras, my finished product is dry chocolate cake dough. Less than 10 carbs and delicious.


#11

I’ve actually been thinking of doing the Pacific Crest Trail (PCT). Although I would have to drastically adjust my recipe as it weighs far too much for me to carry.


#12

Okay, I couldn’t wait to get home to try out a solid version of my recipe. I dropped the psyllium because I hate it and added peanut butter back in as well as an ounce of finely minced dark chocolate. I didn’t add any water at all. Once my banana and oils were mixed it it clumped into a ball.

It’s a bit chewy but the flavor is pleasant, and a little crunchy since I include Selba and I switched from brown sugar to Demerara Raw cane sugar so those granules are a bit larger.

I love the option of making a shake (4 scoops of power/oil/flavor mix + water) or eating some of my nuggets. A full days batch of powder turned into 14 walnut sized nuggets.

I’m glad you guys started this thread. Options are wonderful, and tasty!


#13

Yes! I think it’s well to have options with something like Soylent. Sounds like Ken might beat me to the Soylent/Logan Bread transformation, unless he invests in a pack mule.


#14

That sounds interesting, Andreas. You and BE doing chocolate cake dough and soylent/PB chocolate bonbons, you guys are gonna corrupt me. I just finished making another batch of soylent for the road trip Friday and after it was made up I did a quick batch of instant chocolate pudding and stirred it into the tubs with the soylent. It only added 290 calories, split four ways so only a minor increase per meal, and I can use the extra calories on a strenuous drive. :wink2: (He said!) I’m not too bothered as I’m at the very bottom of my weight range just now, sitting on 145.


#15

If you’re experiencing grittiness, you want to add a little more water to smooth it out. I find that it congeals a bit in the fridge, so make it a little wetter than you think, and you should hit the sweet spot. (Shoot for the consistency of peanut butter, and what you’ll get is more like cookie dough.)


#16

I actually like the texture right now. It’s similar to eating a thick date.


#17

What was her name? Sorry, couldn’t resist.