Soylent 2.0 ice cream


#1

Has anyone found a good combination of additives to make Soylent 2.0 ice cream come out good?

I’d ideally like a recipe that doesn’t dramatically change the nutritional profile, for example, adding VitaFiber, sucralose drops, and vanilla flavors would all be fine.


#2

That sounds like it could make a tasty treat - Soylent 2 “Ice Cream!” Too much prep time for me, takes out the Joy of Soylent :wink:


#3

Strawberry (or similar flavor) gelatin can be added to act as a stabilizer, to prevent ice crystals from forming, which improves texture and extends the life of the ice cream.

Read more: http://blog.seasonwithspice.com/p/tips-on-making-ice-cream-at-home.html#ixzz4BWbwgWN2


#4

Tried making ice cream today with 2 bottles of Soylent 2.0 and 1/2 cup Waldenfarms Sugar-free choc syrup. Tasted good, but texture was extremely “icy” and not creamy. Reminded me of the old days when “ice milk” was popular as a low-fat sub for ice cream.

Ideas for additives in future experiments to potentially improve texture:
Xanthan gum
Erythritol
Polydextrose
Vodka

I would welcome input from anyone more proficient in ice-cream making.


#5

I think the lack of saturated fats gives it a weak texture, maybe some additives can reduce ice crystal formation to get a creamier texture. Or dump in some saturated fats like coconut milk/oil?


#6

This article seems relevant: Scientists Turn to Unsaturated Fats for Healthier Ice Cream:

Given that unsaturated fats are liquid, the original thought was that they would not be good candidates to make ice cream less of a sin. Recent research, however, has the skeptics thinking twice. New studies led by Douglas Goff of the University of Guelph in Ontario suggest that plateletlike or needlelike droplets (as opposed to spheres) that contain 40 to 60 percent unsaturated fats are very effective at building structure in ice cream. Such fats can be blends of any highly unsaturated oil (such as high-oleic sunflower or canola oil) and saturated fats such as coconut oil or cocoa butter. Platelets formed only when Goff’s team added commonly used unsaturated emulsifiers, such as glycerol monooleate, which are thought to force the fat crystals to grow preferentially in one dimension, hence generating the needlelike profile. Because of their shape, the amount of fat needed to create a stable frozen foam (via partial coalescence) decreases. This opens up the possibility for low(er) fat, creamy, slow-melting ice cream.


#7

Work in progress, but here’s my current recipe, which is pretty good:

In a bowl, whisk the following dry ingredients:
1/3 cup polydextrose or VitaFiber
2 Tbsp erythritol
2 Tbsp xylitol
1/8 tsp xanthan gum
1/4 cup cocoa powder (I used Hershey’s special dark)

Add 1 bottle chilled Soylent 2.0, 1 tsp vanilla flavor, 4 drops Sweetz-free brand sucralose drops (comparable to one “packet” of sugar-free sweetener) and whisk with powder until smooth. Put in ice cream mixer.

Nutrition info: The xylitol adds somewhere in the ballpark of 12g of carbs. The cocoa powder adds some fat. The rest of the ingredients are calorie free, so the nutritional value isn’t too far off from what Soylent contains. (Be aware that this recipe has a LOT of fiber, and some people are sensitive to xylitol, so eat sparingly the first time until you know how your stomach handles it).