Soylent and Weight Watchers


#1

I’ve been on Weight Watchers for a little while now and I’ve been having some good results with it. Two big problems I’ve been having though is making sure my diet is varied enough and staying on the diet when I work night shift. I just got my first order of Soylent and I’m really excited about the possibility of it fixing both those issues.

The problem I’m having is accounting for the Soylent I drink in my Weight Watchers diet. If I did all the calculating right (I’m pretty sure I did) then 1 scoop (135ml) of Soylent is 10 “points,” and I’m only allotted 37 points a day! That just doesn’t seem right and 1 scoop of Soylent definitely doesn’t fill me up like 10 points worth of nearly anything else.

The Weight Watchers calculator only takes into account fat, carbs, fiber, and protein (all in grams) so I feel like there’s a good chance they’re missing something.

So has anyone else here ever tried to incorporate Soylent into Weight Watchers? Or does anyone have any input about how Weight Watchers is doing their calculation and if it’s a fair representation for Soylent?


#2

I got 13 points per 500 calorie serving for 1.4. 11 with the old calculator. This is probably where you need to be for weight loss unless you are very active. Maybe adding some protein powder or psyllum for fiber would make it more filling. There has also been a lot of discussion about how the feeling of satiation with soylent is different and takes getting used to.


#3

You won’t feel full after 670 calories of Soylent but you will feel that you did eat and a feeling of satiety. It’s not the pat your belly kind of full more like the “I had a good meal” kind of full. Hunger does not continue after this until the next time you need to eat.

I don’t know much about how WW’s work but it seems that going by your BMR and consuming the recommended amount for your BMR to lose weight is 99% effective. If you needed 1500 kcal a day to lose weight, you would need to keep up with this for at least 3-6 months before you notice a significant improvement.

I am like you but only in the opposite direction. I was 20lbs underweight so I was recommended to consume 2400 calories and in about 6 months I would regain the 20lbs that I lost. Like a lot of dieters, I usually cheated and went 2k a day or 1400 a day here and there. Despite this cheating, I did gain the weight because I more often than not stuck with it. It’s important to remember that you shouldn’t kick yourself for cheating here and there. It’s natural to do this. If you kick yourself too hard, you may feel down and want to quit, but don’t do this. We know what happens to the body when x and y happens. It’s not a big mystery. Aside from those with rare medical conditions, you can gain or lose weight by doing this.

If you are worried about not feeling full, you can do what jej recommends and add some fiber. You can add quite a bit more without it preventing absorption. There is information about this somewhere about this limit.

You could try the whole BMR thing (the 1500 kcal example) and just consume that much Soylent everyday. I personally would think the Soylent would be easier to see what you are consuming every day because it’s very visual and you know exactly what you are getting each time.


#4

Perhaps I can suggest a slightly different approach than trying to figure out how many points a scoop of Soylent is. Below is a link to the Soylent calorie estimator. Enter your stats and see what it suggests your calorie intake should be. Then divide by how many meals you eat. Soylent is about 1 calorie per milliliter.

http://diy.soylent.me/nutrient-profiles/calculator


#5

Yea this is why WW has worked so well for me. They have weekly points too so if I’ve been pretty good about staying on track all week I can treat myself at the end.

Is there a brand or type of supplement that people generally use to add fiber to Soylent? Most of the stuff I’ve seen it seems like you have to drink it right away after mixing it or it congeals.

Yea but like I said, WW has worked a lot better for me then just plain calorie counting and I don’t plan on Soylent being completely 100% of my diet.


#6

Sorry, I didn’t mean to say that you shouldn’t use what works for you or come off as sounding like you should do it my way. Certainly you should use whatever you find works for you. I can see now that you wouldn’t want to go 100% Soylent.

I think many tend to use Psyllium Husk Powder: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B002RWUNYM?tag=19-82341-20


#7

My wife and I did Weight Watchers about 8 years ago, under the old points system. It’s a good system overall, and both of us hit our goal weights and held it off for a time… Then over the course of about 5 years we gained all of the weight back.

For me, the biggest problem with WW (and presumably any other counting-based diet system) is long-term maintenance. It’s just not realistic to count every point of every bite of food every day, quite possibly for the rest of one’s life. I also feel that WW’s guidelines for daily points are geared to aggressive weight loss, which for me also meant a lot more hunger pangs and other cravings. That’s not to say it’s a bad system, just that I think it falls short with long-term maintenance.

Enter Soylent. I’ve been having 12oz breakfasts (~375 calories, ~9 WW points) and 14oz lunches (~450 calories, ~12 WW points) for the past six months now, plus have made a few other modest changes… smarter about snacking, moderately healthier choices at dinner, and taking care to stop eating before I get full. (Oddly Soylent seems to have made this last bit easier; I don’t really put more thought into it, I’m just somehow more aware that I should stop eating sooner than I used to. YMMV.) I’m guessing I’m hitting in the 1800-2000 calorie range every day, which is nicely in the weight-loss zone based on BMR.

Just on those changes alone, I’m down 25lbs in six months. But the best part is, it’s sustainable indefinitely… As long as I keep my Soylent pitcher full in the fridge, it’s easy to stick to the plan. No tracking, no calculating (beyond eyeball-measuring my Soylent pour), and no need to save up points for that special meal, because I’m eating the same foods for dinner that I always have (yay taco night!), just in better moderation.

My current method is surely not the fastest way to lose weight, and I’ve got another 50lbs to go so I’ll likely need to make a few more adjustments. But I didn’t put the weight on quickly either so I’m fine with the pace. Plus my real goal is keeping the weight off long-term in a sustainable way, versus quickly crossing the goal line just to bounce back up yet again.

The biggest challenge I’ve had (and it’s not really that big) was adjusting to feeling only satiated versus full. It took about a month to adjust, but now I rarely crave anything more after finishing my serving. What really works for me is to get away from the table once my glass is empty… I don’t usually feel “done” at that moment, but if don’t sit there and stare at my empty glass, any lingering hunger pangs disappear after only a few minutes. I never feel full like I would on a solid meal, but I’m definitely no longer hungry, and it’s a good 2-3 hours before thoughts of food or snacking drift back in, longer if I follow my meal with a cup of hot tea.

I’d recommend sticking with the 10-or-so point Soylent meals. Give yourself a few weeks to try to adjust to feeling satiated. And don’t be afraid to adjust the Soylent upwards a bit to help get used to satiety.


#8

Apparently Weight Watchers (the company) is hemorrhaging money and is in serious financial trouble.

Just saw this today and thought it was interesting.


#9

That’s what I’m worried about too. I don’t like the idea of tracking everything I eat for the rest of my life but I honestly don’t see any alternative really. I know myself and I have a tendency to overindulge. I’m hoping that Soylent will help me get to a situation similar to yours, where I can just rough guess things and it’ll work, at least to maintain my weight once I loose it. For now I’m going to stick with WW and see how that goes. So far I’ve been doing OK with incorporating Soylent into the WW system, just still feeling pretty hungry. Hopefully adding some fiber will help and just getting used to it.

Thanks everyone for the advice!


#10

Hopefully a system like WW will over time teach you how to eat a different way. It might take a while to change long ingrained habits but habits do change.

Regarding hunger, I think it’s OK. I used a partial Soylent diet and a calorie tracker to help me lose 10 pounds recently. Humans have spent most of our existence being hungry; bountiful food options are a 20th century phenomenon. We’re not used to feeling hungry and it can make us irritable, but it’s natural. Meditation helped me be OK with that feeling. Also, staring down that cookie and asking, “Who’s stronger, me or the cookie?” I usually was :smile:


#11

I sometimes wonder if that isn’t one of the important differences between the 60s and 70s and now regarding obesity. I grew up in the 60s and 70s and you ate at mealtimes. Snacks happened but they were rare enough to be “treats”. It allowed for a very controlled diet (meat, two veg, dessert). Hunger was a good feeling as long as one knew when dinner was going to be.

Eve


#12

Toubab,

You mentioned you received your order a few days ago – have you tried it yet? If so, are you enjoying it?

If I’m reading your post right your saying that 1 “meal” worth of soylent is about 1/4 of your daily WW points – that seems spot on.

I was skeptical too when I first ordered Soylent, but I’ve found that 16oz of prepped soylent (which I believe equals 1 scoop) really does work as a lunch.

Am I Stuffed? No, Is it as filling a a chipotle burrito and bag of tortilla chips and pound of guac? No. But it makes me not hungry and gives me energy and doesn’t put me in a food coma.

Give us your feedback when you have a chance :).