Soylent Bath for skin health?


#1

So I had a thought tonight while mixing up my Soylent. As someone who’s had eczema my whole life, one of the best things I can do for my skin is add colloidal oatmeal to my bath water. Soylent is mostly just that, mixed with a bunch of vitamins and nutrients, some Maltodextrin and rice protein. If I put some Soylent powder into a bath, would it make my skin all healthy?

Thoughts like these must be why people think Soylent is a cult.


#2

I have no words to describe how uncomfortable this sounds. So… grainy…

Then again I’m a shower guy, so what do I know?


#3

Yeah it’s mostly women who are into such things, but if you’ve ever used an exfoliating/scrubbing bath/shower gel… very very gritty stuff, but my gal has used them for ages and they don’t phase her. They’re still odd for me and I only use them if I’ve gotten particularly dirty from something.

That being said… I can imagine Soylent being reasonably suited to what the OP is describing. Sounds a bit pricey however at $10 per bag!


#4

I doubt the additional nutrients and vitamins in Soylent would absorb through your skin. You would probably be better off just using bath salts. That would probably be considerably cheaper too.


#5

Isnt consuming soylent helping you get rid of it? i ask this because there are supposedly eight kinds of foods that cause allergies/various sensitivities. And soylent helps people avoid them to a large extent.


#6

[quote=“vanclute, post:3, topic:19413”]
Sounds a bit pricey however at $10 per bag!
[/quote]You haven’t been wandering the cosmetics aisle lately have you. :wink: I don’t often either but lately I had to purchase some foot cream.

Eve


#7

Eve,

Not related to soylent. I think the govt should subsidise or give away cosmetics to women for free like they do with contraceptives if i remember correctly. What do you think?


#8

Why? So I get to subsidize women who wear them?

Eve


#9

hmm good point. I guess then they should do it without raising taxes.

Wait, Scr*w it its not possible under obama.


#10

What has Obama got to do with it?

Eve


#11

obama=govt no? Or will the same thing happen in other countries too.


#12

No. I’m not talking about a particular head of state. It’s a ridiculous idea.

Eve


#13

huh! i hadn’t thought of that… but it’s an intriguing idea. you should do it (in the name of science!) and report back your results. :smile:

(unless there’s any chance it could aggravate your skin condition…then i would feel bad for suggesting that you try it. i might have to try this at some point. my girlfriend will probably think i’m crazy, but it’d be good for a laugh if nothing else)


#14

Some of us are “starving” for Soylent, while others ponder about bathing in it. But to combat this “have” versus “have not” mentality, maybe you can resell your bath water…as fertilizer for the grass and trees. NO people! Not so others can finally get their hands on Soylent. Gross! :scream:


#15

LOL touche! I forget sometimes how much some people will pay for beauty…


#16

LOL! this was the funniest manifestation of the order delay disgruntlement I’ve ever seen.


#17

So keep in mind that this is just coming from some kid doing half-assed research online but…

I was on Wikipedia and noticed that, among the B-complex vitamins, the 4, 8, 10 and 11 vitamins were missing. Being curious, I went off to look those up individually and came across this:

http://www.healthwhatis.com/what-is-vitamin-b10/

Which states rather matter-of-factly that “Vitamin B10 acts as an anti allergen, which means it will treat and prevent skin allergies and diseases such as eczema”.

So maybe you should spike your formula with some PABA and watch for a few weeks :smiley:

After jumping through a few different tabs in between writing this, I read that PABA deficiency is known to cause eczema but as a pre-existing condition, it may play only a small part, if at all. Sorry if I’m telling you what you already knew; after all I’ve only known what the actual affliction is for about 10 minutes x)

I hope you’re able to find a way to control this though. After all, it’s compromising your largest organ! Well, second largest - AMIRITE LADIES. HEYO!

Honestly, I’d hang in there for a decade or two. Hopefully by then you can get an injection of nanobots that patrol outbreaks in your skin. Who knows?


#18

More info if you’re interested. Upon further reading, a few sites have claimed that PABA suppliments are a hoax because there are no enzymes in the body to break it down. No further elaboration was made, nor any sources provided, so I ran a search of the keywords “eczema” and “PABA” on my cloud (mostly used to store journal archives). I got a few results, the most promising being a published study in Investigative Dermatology. I can’t share the full paper with you so I looked for the abstract on Nature and found this: http://www.nature.com/jid/journal/v19/n6/full/jid1952122a.html#tlnote1

The lead researcher emphasized intervals of subcutaneous dispersion of PABA and Vitamin E in solution, yeilding impressive results almost immediately.

I like your idea of using topical nutrients (via bath for example) to treat dermatalogical afflictions. I think silver nanoparticulate textiles could have a role to play. They are meant for anti-microbial applications, but I believe they could assist with skin allergies as well. Beds and clothing are currently on the market for such purposes, though the reviews I’ve seen are not well substantiated.

As I alluded to in my last post, I think nipping this in the bud once in for all will take exhaustive electrochemical/mechanical bioengineering. Until then, best of luck with supression efforts! :smile:


#19

thanks for all the info! I’ll have to look into it (and perhaps see how my dermatologist feels)