Soylent cookies/bars... ideas?


#1

So I know there’s been some discussion about the desire for a Soylent bar/cookie. I would also love to have a solid-form snack made from Soylent, and hence why I’ve been making brownies so often. But I keep thinking that maybe I could make a “brownie” of sorts that had almost nothing else added, both to simplify the baking process and also to stay as true to Soylent as possible.

A couple of my brownie batches came out a bit too dry, and in hindsight they were ALMOST like a very soft biscotti. It’s got me wondering if maybe I could make a soylent bar that was just Soylent, oil & water, and maybe a touch of brown sugar.

Has anyone tried this before? I know when I made actual Soylent cookies the batter was SO sticky it was basically impossible to work with. Brownies have been much less sticky, but then I’m also not rolling them by hand into cookie dough balls. Maybe a pan-baked non-brownie would be easy to make and easily cut into bars/squares/whatever.

I’m feeling experimental today and just got our shipping notice of our next Soylent subscription so we’re quite flush with the stuff at the moment. I may just risk some for this experiment… anyone have any thoughts to add?


#2

My first “bar” experiment is now underway…


#3

Looking forward to seeing your results! :wink:


#4

Well I can say that my first thought of these being “no bake” and simple setting up in the fridge, is a no-go. It basically chilled into a dough at best. So, I just baked it for 5 mins on high in the microwave, and it seems like it’s basically turned into a “blondie” of sorts. Not sure about the smell… taste is yet to be determined as it’s cooling now. I have a feeling this will be a failed experiment, but a step in the right direction nonetheless!

I’m also considering a “rice Soylent treat” to see how that works out. Perhaps the cereal will act as something of a cohesive agent to give it structure.


#5

Well I’ll be damned… these are actually delicious! They cooked up a little weirdly, and have a tough crust on top and are soft below that. I also forgot to grease the wax paper before pouring the batter, so they are REALLY stuck to the paper. But once that’s peeled off… I’m shocked at how good these are! They’re quite light, they just have a very mellow flavor… nothing hits you over the head at all - quite like Soylent itself in that way. But they have a very nice residual aftertaste, and easily cut into a bar type shape if one so desires. They are only very slightly crumbly, so they hold up pretty well to carrying around.

I think I’m onto something here. There’s VERY little in them other than Soylent, but I’m going to see if I can’t refine the process slightly more at which time I’ll make the recipe public.

Now I wanna go have some more of these things. :wink:


#6

I just figured out what these taste like! A light snickerdoodle without the cinnamon.

Which has got me thinking… adding a little cinnamon to these would probably out of this world. I think I know what I’m gonna try next!


#7

Well, my “SoylentDoodle™” idea was a partial success. It’s quite tasty, and definitely tastes just like a snickerdoodle! Unfortunately I made a couple of miscalculations in my baking approach, and I ended up essentially with a brick. That being said, I broke off a chunk and heated it until it softened enough to eat, and as mentioned it’s mighty tasty. A little sugar, oil, and cinnamon plus Soylent and that’s all.

I need to nail down the issues with the baking, that’s definitely where my current troubles lie. I have a feeling that it’s a case of too high a power setting on the microwave, so I’m going to try a lower setting next.

It’s encouraging to me at least that every experiment - even the “failures” - has tasted good!


#8

why hasn’t RL hired you yet


#9

LOL I did offer myself up as a formal evangelist if they ever want one, but in general I’m not really “for hire” like as an employee anyway. Been calling my own shots and working for myself for wayyyyy too long. I make a lousy employee, but a great hired gun. :wink:


#10

I gave up on waiting for your answer. My attempt at a soylent bar is in the oven and it smells amazing already

EDIT: its out of the oven.

(that hole is where I poked it with a fork)

To me, they turned out really bland, I think I’ll add more brown sugar next time, but the texture turned out PERFECT. I’ll definitely be making these more often. If you make them, be sure to have some water (or milk, they go great with milk) on hand because they will make you extremely thirsty! I’ll try to have a recipe for soylent bars up by the end of the week.


#11

Very cool! You used a conventional oven I assume? Could you please share your cooking temperature and time? Those are the elements I’m most interested in at the moment.


#12

So I kinda messed around. my initial thought was 350 because it seems like everything bakes at 350, but after around 15 minutes they were still liquidy so I turned it up to 365 and baked it another maybe 10 minutes. For my next batch I’ll probably try 370… I’m guessing it will take about 10-15 minutes at that temperature. I’ll try to be more exact next time. I also added a tiny bit of butter and as little egg as I could manage to get out of an egg.


#13

Did you go for adding egg white, yolk, or both? I’ve only used whole eggs so far.


#14

I tried to add a bit of both. Honestly I don’t think I added enough to actually make much of a difference in the baking, though they did rise a little


#15

Yeah my latest tests used no egg at all and frankly I don’t think it’s needed, at least not for a “bar” of some kind. Maybe for more traditional baked goods like brownies, cookies, or cakes. But even just straight baked soylent with a touch of maple syrup and some oil, turned out tasty.


#16

Yeah, I think for my next batch this is how the recipe will go

1 cup soylent
2 tsp oil blend
1 tsp butter
1/4tsp (or the smallest amount you can get) Baking soda
1 tbsp Brown Sugar
2 tsp White sugar
Cinnamon to taste

Heat oven to 370 degrees and bake for 10-15 minutes (until they start to pull away form edges of pan and middle is no longer liquidy)


#17

Ah you’ve touched on something I haven’t tried but have been considering - combining BOTH brown & white sugar. I’ve only tried either/or. Apparently white will lead to a crispier result, so I think for a more "granola bar"or cookie-like result it might be the better choice. But then again a bit of both might yield an interesting result as well!

I also found that a little cinnamon goes a very long way. I used only 1tsp in my snickerdoodle experiment and they came out nice & cinnamon-y. It was actually less than I had planned to use but something told me at 1 tsp, to stop. Potent stuff!


#18

Question:
1 cup soylent

  • liquid I assume. Does it include the oil that comes with it? Or, is
    that the “2 tsp oil blend”?

#19

nono not liquid. I’m sorry I mean to add 3 tbsp water in that recipe.


#20

Waitwaitwait, could we get this recipe in something like standard form? Like so:

Mix dry ingredients in a bowl:

  • 1C Soylent powder
  • 1/4t baking powder
  • 1T brown sugar
  • 2t white sugar
  • 1t cinnamon powder

Cut in liquids and mix to a dough:

  • 3T water
  • 2t Soylent oil blend
  • 1t butter (just one teaspoon?)

What quality of dough should this make, stiff?
Put into what size of pan?
Cook at 370deg for 10-15 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean?