"Soylent may be popular, but we don’t know enough about GMOs"


#1

Op-Ed: “Soylent may be popular, but we don’t know enough about GMOs

Presumably the same could be said (“we don’t know enough yet”) about most food classifications. (organic, “all-natural”, free-range, “farm fresh”, etc.)


#2

Typical anti-GMO anti-soy BS.


#3

First use of the term “biological farmers” I’ve seen. What’s the antonym, android farmers?

It’s interesting that the engineering of food doesn’t bother the author but the engineering of crops does. I would have thought anyone concerned about one would be concerned about the other.


#4

I don’t know enough about what we don’t know enough about yet.


#5

The Universe may be popular, but we don’t know enough about the standard model.


#6

Food has been organic for 11,800 out of the last 12,000 years of agriculture — the first 98%. And during that whole time people were… really sick and unhealthy actually, never mind.


#7

I have a modest concern about GMO products, and very much question the approach to make foods more resistant to pesticides. I am more concerned about exploitation of intellectual property rights afforded seed distributors, where unavoidable cross pollination of traditional crops leaves a farmer infringing.
That said, I have spent time surrounded by GMO research, as detailed in this stunning video.


#8

You use less pesticides with GMO’s, not more.

And we’ve been breeding our food for a few thousand years. Taking the best crop and planting it, and cutting down plants we don’t like. For the past few hundred we’ve been selectively breeding and physically splicing plants and cloning from cuttings. Not to mention nature has mixed genes between species before, such as the sweet potato. GMO’s isn’t doing anything new, just faster and more selective.

That said, there’s still concerns, mainly monoculture (depending on a single plant), and property rights. The potato famine in Ireland was because of depending on a single crop, and putting the power over a food supply into the hands of a small group of people is dangerous.

But the technology itself is safe. Or at least as save as any other technology, like fire.


#9

The hazards of monoculture and of hyper-concentrated property rights aren’t insignificant.


#10

[quote=“asympt, post:9, topic:24224, full:true”]The hazards of monoculture and of hyper-concentrated property rights aren’t insignificant.[/quote]I agree.

Though the algae that Soylent uses doesn’t have either of those problems.