Soylent now unavailable in Canada


#42

Is there someone on our ends that Soylent could recommend we talk with to voice just how ludicrous this is?


#43

Man, I feel so bad when I heard about this. I could only imagine depending on this product then suddenly having no access to it because of some backward CFIA regulation.

Is there a way to protest the CFIA’s decision?


#44

I don’t know much about Canada but I imagine it’s a matter of there being a law, so maybe the only way to change the decision is to change the law.


#45

We have a few options, such as:

  • Bribe them with maple syrup & poutine
  • Debate the law in the Senate Igloo
  • Pull the goalie
  • Create another underground railroad, ideally with shopping carts and cats
  • Apologize

#46

The problem is that the CFIA objection is precisely what draws me to Soylent in the first place. If Soylent had more sugar like the Boost type products then it could market as a meal replacement because the calories would come from non-fat sources. I’m specifically into trying to cut back on my sugar consumption.

As stated in the rest of this thread, CFIA wants to enforce a disproven dietary standard.


#47

If carbs have to be added, hopefully they can be something lower-glycemic than maltodextrin.


#48

My biggest fear is that Soylent’s formulation for everyone would be changed to meet Canada’s specifications. That is unlikely, I hope.


#49

Table sugar has a much lower glysemic index than maltodextrine.


#50

I like your idea above of letting the customers add the fat. I liked the oil bottles, anyway.


#51

After posting the above about table sugar, I read some threads that say that Soylent uses a type of malodextrine with a lower glysemic index than other malodextrines.


#52

My biggest fear is that they’ll just say “screw Canada”.


#53

This is my biggest fear as well. In fact, I sincerely hope that Soylent doesn’t sacrifice innovation and up to date nutritional science when it comes to the international expansion as well as this Canada thing. At the very least the cutting edge should always be available while the product for other countries should be changed. Conor, any assurances that this won’t hamper innovation in the core product?


#54

As a Canadian I very much agree. There are always ways we can get the product (own use imports are exempt from content requirements…), I would hope that those in Canada who use Soylent will continue to let their government know they aren’t happy, and I’d hope Soylent continues to fight to get the product in. I wouldn’t like to settle for a ‘substandard’ product just to make the CFIA happy.


#55

Everything’s listing as backordered. Any chance Conor that there might be a box of 1.8 hiding out in the back of the warehouse?


#56

This seems like a reasonable solution


#57

Is there any hope CFIA will change its mind? :cry: :cry: :cry:

I sent CFIA a message of complaint here.


#58

OR we can add anything on the McDonalds menu. :star_struck::fries::plate_with_cutlery:. :us::canada:

Soylent products have been sold here for two years, what the fuck has changed that the CFIA views Soylent as a more jeopardizing product over any of the offerings from the countless fast food establishments that have been rooted here for years.

Dear Canadian powers that be please tell us all now how smoking is something with an actual added health benefit by walking to the corner market.


#59

Is there any news at all for this situation?


#60

I doubt it. As Conor said, they will have to do something like create a whole new product to serve Canada. That isn’t easy, though I hope some of the suggestions in this thread might help. They have to create a product that meets Canadian regulations, then they have to test it to make sure it is ok. That isn’t a quick process.


#61

@Conor Is there anything new that may have developed for this situation?