Soylid: Solid soylent muffins with very few additives!


#1

I love the idea of soylent, but just drinking a bland milk-like substance does NOT do it for me. So I’ve done some research on the threads, and found the best recipe I could to make a solid soylent version that doesn’t include things like syrup, chocolate, sugar etc.

1 bag dry Soylent 1.5
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg (cancels the weird sunflower seed oil flavor)
1 tsp vanilla extract (helps the flavor)
1 cup water
OPTIONAL:
A handful of raisins (flavor/texture)
1 cup plain dry oats (texture)

Mix ingredients and bake.
325 F for 30 minutes, let cool 5 minutes after removing from oven.
Makes 36 mini muffins or cookies. Be sure to use muffin paper cups or parchment paper, or they’ll stick. And be careful about overfilling, as they puff up quite a bit!

Make sure to bake until they really start to brown, otherwise the centers will be gooey. They will also be gooey if you make them too big, since the outside cooks quite a bit faster. I recommend making the batch for the day at least a day in advance, that way the middles harden. The end result is a slightly dense, chewy muffin/cookie with a bit of crunch on the exterior. A bit like a specialized protein bar!

This recipe is adapted from JeffD’s mini muffins here.

Here’s a link to some info about what happens to soylent when you bake it. It looks like the solution is to just take a multivitamin, as most everything else stays intact. These are preliminary results, of course though!

I’d love to see any other simple recipes I may have missed!


#2

I note you mention that you made these out of v1.4. Think it’ll work with other versions? Looks tasty.


#3

Ooops I typoed. I used V1.5. Though the recipe I altered it from used 1.4 so I’m betting it’ll work with any recent version. It was mentioned that V1.4 doesn’t rise well, so some people have been adding baking soda or another levening agent, which isn’t necessary for V1.5.


#4

This is awesome!
How much does one bag make?


#5

Thanks! It makes about 36 mini muffins, like i said. I’m leaning towards the cookie version because they are flatter so they cook all the way through, but you have to be careful to make them pretty small. You want to end up with about 36 cookies even if you’re eyeballing it!


#6

So, how many muffins is a normal serving of Soylent? I assume if it makes 36 muffins it is about 9?


#7

Depends on your calorie intake. With the raisins, they are about 57 calories each. I’m small and female so I only eat 1,200-1,400 calories per day. I just eat about 20-25 muffins through out the day, usually 2-4 at a time. I’m betting your food pattern will be way different from mine, if you’re aiming for 2,000 calories in 4 meals then 9 at a time sounds about right!


#8

I love this idea! But has anyone been able to ascertain whether heating soylent to this level destroys any of the nutruents’ values?


#9

Go ahead and check out the link I have in the original post. So far all I’ve been able to find is a study in progress, they seem the think the only thing that is hurt is the vitamin content. But again, the paper hasn’t been published yet (it’s at UC Berkeley)!


#10

The texture sounds good, but how is the taste? Does it pretty much taste like Soylent, or does that vanilla and nutmeg come through well, or is it like bread…?


#11

Honestly, they taste kind of like the outside of a fig neuton. They are pretty sweet, from the vanilla, and the nutmeg cuts the sunflower oil taste of the soylent, but doesn’t come through much. With the raisins, they have a similar flavor to oatmeal raisin cookies, but a wildly different texture.


#12

Update: I added dry oats to my last batch and the texture was AMAZING! The cookies are so delicious now, I actually want to eat them. It’s another additive and not necessary, but for very few calories and a healthy food I think it is worth it on occasion.


#13

How much of the oats did you use? Sounds yummy!


#14

I updated the recipe in the main post, I used 1 cup of dry oats!