Teeth Sensitivity


#1

I’ve only been on my DIY Soylent for 8 days now. I have had a total of 3 regular meals and now I am doing my first snack.
And most days that I have been on Soylent I have chewed a stick of gum (Big Red) for a minimum of 2 hours.

I went to Dairy Queen I am eating a soft serve ice cream “blizzard”. (Butterfinger if you want to know). And I have noticed that my teeth are extremely sensitive to the cold of the ice cream.

I never had a problem with this in the past, but now it hurts to even eat a spoon full. Of course this won’t stop me from eating it, but it does bring up a question.

Has anyone else noticed tooth sensitivity while on Soylent?


#2

You’re not using your teeth so they lose practice. Interesting.


#3

maybe gums are too soft? try something harder, I’ll do the same starting with toothpicks, pieces of leather…I already started feeling like a rodent O_o


#4

Do you tend to get plaque build up? If so, regular brushing on a liquid diet will have more of an effect, removing the plaque that would otherwise be there. This will end up exposing the lower portions of your teeth that are more sensitive to temperature.

See if you can swing by a dentist or ask your doctor about mouth washes or toothpaste for tooth sensitivity. Otherwise I don’t believe there’s much else can be done, but on the bright side your teeth are probably healthier now.


#5

Besides my teeth being stained yellow (some complication when I was a baby), and being crooked, my teeth are perfect. I have low tarter, plaque and no cavities.

@sogviper
I may have to try chewing on something a little more tough.

I may swing by the dentist though to check.


#6

My first guess actually would be that your soylent is acidic and that this is eating away at your tooth enamel. I noticed this once when I was drinking a lot of homemade lemonade. Soylent contains a number of acids (ascorbic acid, amino acids, fatty acids, pantothenic acid, etc). Some basic stuff too, and I don’t what it’s ph would be on balance, but this might be your problem. Try brushing your teeth immediately after consuming soylent. See if this works.


#7

I felt this sense on my teeth a lot, I also suggest much better care of the teeth and brushing than with usual food. I’m brushing with bicarbonate soda and its fine. If I leave my teeth unbrushed for more than ~4 hrs after soylent, I get this strong urge to clean them, I’ve always been conscious about my mouth’s hygiene and I see the difference from normal food and soylent strongly.

Also I’ve read somewhere (sorry don’t remember source) that you mustn’t brush your teeth immediately after eating because the acidity weakens the enamel, and brushing at this state might damage it over time. I haven’t checked it yet, but I will.

In the meantime I rinse my mouth with water right after ‘eating’ and brush them 3 times a day instead of one.


#8

I wouldn’t recommend brushing immediately after consuming anything, as that can actually be harder on your enamel - eating or drinking softens it, and then it’s more likely to be damaged by the toothbrush. I’d suggest swishing with water (or just drinking some) instead.


#9

Wanted to bump this to see how long term soylent users’ teeth (and gums) are holding up.

I never realized how the acidity of soylent could really mess around with my gums and teeth. Surprisingly, even my tongue feels abused after months of soylent (it doesn’t look all that pretty either, honestly…)

Is anyone else having this problem? Solutions? Brushing more?


#10

interresting… this brings up an important question I now have for the official soylent… specially since I have no enamel anymore after years of coca cola abuse… @rob and @JulioMiles what is the pH of a serving of Soylent after the recommended water has been added? if it is actually acidic… even a little, would it be possible to add something to make it closer to 6-7?

for everyone else, could you guys check what your pH is at on your diy’s?


#11

If you think this would be helpful, I will definitely try to check pH. Anecdotally, my DIY sure feels acidic. Not particularly strong, but if I don’t rinse, drink enough water, or pass out without brushing, I’m a swollen mess. I may just be more sensitive than others, but I’ve never had this problem before.

Hey @maxk, have you run into this problem at all?


#12

My DIY soylent have an acidity of 7(normal water), 300g soy lent and then between 600-700ml water. ad More water to delude the acidic substances in to a more neutral level.


#13

I can’t believe nobody noticed this: Big Red is not a sugar-free gum.

If you chew sugary things for two hours every day for over a week you might expect some tooth sensitivity. Please don’t do that.


#14

I have not tried DIY Soylent so I can’t comment on that, but I do have fairly severe teeth sensitivity and have been to a dentist so I can tell you the potential causes and solutions.

For me, it’s caused by eroding gums. This sounds much worse than it looks, basically the gums are just not covering the roots of my teeth as much as they used to. A dentist can tell just by looking. The cause of gum erosion is brushing too hard, according to my dentist. He told me to get an extra soft toothbrush and hold it like I would hold a pencil, to prevent me from pressing too hard. He cautioned me to never press hard when I brush, and said it’s the length of time that I brush that gets the plaque off, NOT the pressure I use on my teeth.

Complicating tooth sensitivity, in addition to gum erosion, is enamel erosion. My dentist told me I must use a toothpaste that contains fluoride to help with this.

So in conclusion, I have switched to an extra soft toothbrush, switched to a toohpaste that contains fluoride, and make sure to not press hard when I brush. Over the past year this has slowly but surely reduced my tooth sensitivity significantly.

Anecdotally, I have found that consuming products with aspartame cause my teeth to temporarily become more sensitive, until several days pass since the last time I ate aspartame. No idea on that one, and have never heard anyone else say it, but it’s happened to me 20+ times and never fails.


#15

I would drink a lot more water daily to help with this problem. The complications of Soylent and the gum remaining on your teeth will be greatly reduced if you continue to drink a lot of water. I mix my Soylent portions with 30oz of water (three a day), as well as drinking another 15oz after and 15oz after I have chewed gum for a bit. I drink more than a gallon a day really.

Try doing this for a week and seeing if it helps. I have sensitive teeth and Sensodyne has always been in my cabinet. Consider in using it once or twice a week with your regular toothpaste.